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Does Altered Cellular Metabolism Underpin the Normal Changes to the Maternal Immune System during Pregnancy?

Benjamin Jenkins, April Rees, Nick Jones Orcid Logo, Cathy Thornton Orcid Logo

Immunometabolism, Volume: 3, Issue: 4, Start page: e210031

Swansea University Authors: Benjamin Jenkins, April Rees, Nick Jones Orcid Logo, Cathy Thornton Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Pregnancy is characterised by metabolic changes that occur to support the growth and development of the fetus over the course of gestation. These metabolic changes can be classified into two distinct phases: an initial anabolic phase to prepare an adequate store of substrates and energy which are th...

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Published in: Immunometabolism
ISSN: 2084-6835 2633-0407
Published: Hapres 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58734
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Abstract: Pregnancy is characterised by metabolic changes that occur to support the growth and development of the fetus over the course of gestation. These metabolic changes can be classified into two distinct phases: an initial anabolic phase to prepare an adequate store of substrates and energy which are then broken down and used during a catabolic phase to meet the energetic demands of the mother, placenta and fetus. Dynamic readjustment of immune homeostasis is also a feature of pregnancy and is likely linked to the changes in energy substrate utilisation at this time. As cellular metabolism is increasingly recognised as a key determinant of immune cell phenotype and function, we consider how changes in maternal metabolism might contribute to T cell plasticity during pregnancy.
Keywords: immunometabolism, maternal metabolism, pregnancy, Treg, Th2
College: Swansea University Medical School
Funders: Swansea University Research Excellence Scholarship; Ser Cymru II, Welsh Government and MRC (MR/V037013)
Issue: 4
Start Page: e210031