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Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity

Andrew Cunningham, Jeffrey Stephens Orcid Logo, Dean Harris Orcid Logo

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders, Volume: 20, Issue: 2, Pages: 1855 - 1870

Swansea University Authors: Andrew Cunningham, Jeffrey Stephens Orcid Logo, Dean Harris Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are common, chronic metabolic disorders with associated significant long-term health problems at global epidemic levels. It is recognised that gut microbiota play a central role in maintaining host homeostasis and through technological advances in both ani...

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Published in: Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders
ISSN: 2251-6581
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58890
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first_indexed 2021-12-06T10:20:14Z
last_indexed 2022-01-01T04:25:18Z
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spelling 2021-12-31T13:09:28.4660986 v2 58890 2021-12-06 Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity 85ba826947f0457916f30b1c4ed8113f Andrew Cunningham Andrew Cunningham true false 5219d126f97f8f884bdb622099bd41de 0000-0003-2228-086X Jeffrey Stephens Jeffrey Stephens true false 731533890c5123febe4f65dffd369f7b 0000-0003-2673-8946 Dean Harris Dean Harris true false 2021-12-06 BMS Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are common, chronic metabolic disorders with associated significant long-term health problems at global epidemic levels. It is recognised that gut microbiota play a central role in maintaining host homeostasis and through technological advances in both animal and human models it is becoming clear that gut microbiota are heavily involved in key pathophysiological roles in the aetiology and progression of both conditions. This review will focus on current knowledge regarding microbiota interactions with short chain fatty acids, the host inflammatory response, signaling pathways, integrity of the intestinal barrier, the interaction of the gut-brain axis and the subsequent impact on the metabolic health of the host. Journal Article Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders 20 2 1855 1870 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2251-6581 Gut microbiota; Obesity; Type two diabetes mellitus 1 12 2021 2021-12-01 10.1007/s40200-021-00858-4 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University 2021-12-31T13:09:28.4660986 2021-12-06T10:17:15.2870468 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Andrew Cunningham 1 Jeffrey Stephens 0000-0003-2228-086X 2 Dean Harris 0000-0003-2673-8946 3 58890__21790__c3a37b2a9c09428f914a082144482bcc.pdf 40200_2021_Article_858.pdf 2021-12-06T10:17:15.2868338 Output 1473748 application/pdf Version of Record true This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity
spellingShingle Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity
Andrew Cunningham
Jeffrey Stephens
Dean Harris
title_short Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity
title_full Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity
title_fullStr Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity
title_full_unstemmed Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity
title_sort Intestinal microbiota and their metabolic contribution to type 2 diabetes and obesity
author_id_str_mv 85ba826947f0457916f30b1c4ed8113f
5219d126f97f8f884bdb622099bd41de
731533890c5123febe4f65dffd369f7b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 85ba826947f0457916f30b1c4ed8113f_***_Andrew Cunningham
5219d126f97f8f884bdb622099bd41de_***_Jeffrey Stephens
731533890c5123febe4f65dffd369f7b_***_Dean Harris
author Andrew Cunningham
Jeffrey Stephens
Dean Harris
author2 Andrew Cunningham
Jeffrey Stephens
Dean Harris
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders
container_volume 20
container_issue 2
container_start_page 1855
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 2251-6581
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s40200-021-00858-4
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str Swansea University Medical School
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hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
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description Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are common, chronic metabolic disorders with associated significant long-term health problems at global epidemic levels. It is recognised that gut microbiota play a central role in maintaining host homeostasis and through technological advances in both animal and human models it is becoming clear that gut microbiota are heavily involved in key pathophysiological roles in the aetiology and progression of both conditions. This review will focus on current knowledge regarding microbiota interactions with short chain fatty acids, the host inflammatory response, signaling pathways, integrity of the intestinal barrier, the interaction of the gut-brain axis and the subsequent impact on the metabolic health of the host.
published_date 2021-12-01T04:15:50Z
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