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Indentation Plastometry of Welds

Wenchen Gu Orcid Logo, Jimmy Campbell Orcid Logo, Yuanbo Tang, HAMED Safaie, Richard Johnston Orcid Logo, Yuchen Gu, Cameron Pleydell-Pearce, Max Burley Orcid Logo, James Dean, Trevor William Clyne Orcid Logo

Advanced Engineering Materials, Start page: 2101645

Swansea University Authors: HAMED Safaie, Richard Johnston Orcid Logo, Yuchen Gu, Cameron Pleydell-Pearce

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/adem.202101645

Abstract

This investigation concerns the application of the profilometry‐based indentation plastometry (PIP) methodology to obtain stress–strain relationships for material in the vicinity of fusion welds. These are produced by The Welding Institute (TWI), using submerged arc welding to join pairs of thick st...

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Published in: Advanced Engineering Materials
ISSN: 1438-1656 1527-2648
Published: Wiley 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59387
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These are produced by The Welding Institute (TWI), using submerged arc welding to join pairs of thick steel plates. The width of the welds varies from about 5 mm at the bottom to about 40–50 mm at the top. For one weld, the properties of parent and weld metal are similar, while for the other, the weld metal is significantly harder than the parent. Both weldments are shown to be approximately isotropic in terms of mechanical response, while there is a small degree of anisotropy in the parent metal (with the through‐thickness direction being slightly softer than the in‐plane directions). The PIP procedure has a high sensitivity for detecting such anisotropy. It is also shown that there is excellent agreement between stress–strain curves obtained using PIP and via conventional uniaxial testing (tensile and compressive). Finally, the PIP methodology is used to explore properties in the transition regime between weld and parent, with a lateral resolution of the order of 1–2 mm. 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spelling v2 59387 2022-02-14 Indentation Plastometry of Welds 8a6186ce81e58f64f1f6877ce8595557 HAMED Safaie HAMED Safaie true false 23282e7acce87dd926b8a62ae410a393 0000-0003-1977-6418 Richard Johnston Richard Johnston true false 615b64048381eea559251d5953bb3cd6 Yuchen Gu Yuchen Gu true false 564c480cb2abe761533a139c7dbaaca1 Cameron Pleydell-Pearce Cameron Pleydell-Pearce true false 2022-02-14 FGSEN This investigation concerns the application of the profilometry‐based indentation plastometry (PIP) methodology to obtain stress–strain relationships for material in the vicinity of fusion welds. These are produced by The Welding Institute (TWI), using submerged arc welding to join pairs of thick steel plates. The width of the welds varies from about 5 mm at the bottom to about 40–50 mm at the top. For one weld, the properties of parent and weld metal are similar, while for the other, the weld metal is significantly harder than the parent. Both weldments are shown to be approximately isotropic in terms of mechanical response, while there is a small degree of anisotropy in the parent metal (with the through‐thickness direction being slightly softer than the in‐plane directions). The PIP procedure has a high sensitivity for detecting such anisotropy. It is also shown that there is excellent agreement between stress–strain curves obtained using PIP and via conventional uniaxial testing (tensile and compressive). Finally, the PIP methodology is used to explore properties in the transition regime between weld and parent, with a lateral resolution of the order of 1–2 mm. This reveals variations on a scale that would be very difficult to examine using conventional testing. Journal Article Advanced Engineering Materials 0 2101645 Wiley 1438-1656 1527-2648 indentation plastometry, inverse finite element method (FEM), welds 13 2 2022 2022-02-13 10.1002/adem.202101645 COLLEGE NANME Science and Engineering - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGSEN Swansea University Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grant: EP/I038691/1 Grant: EP/M028267/1 Grant: EM/2019-038/4 Grant: IN-2016-004 Grant: ST/R006105/1 2022-07-26T09:28:19.6310883 2022-02-14T09:43:03.6360333 College of Engineering Engineering Wenchen Gu 0000-0002-3176-2708 1 Jimmy Campbell 0000-0001-9158-1418 2 Yuanbo Tang 3 HAMED Safaie 4 Richard Johnston 0000-0003-1977-6418 5 Yuchen Gu 6 Cameron Pleydell-Pearce 7 Max Burley 0000-0002-8102-4105 8 James Dean 9 Trevor William Clyne 0000-0003-2163-1840 10 59387__22365__b23117288b2f4243ba2a0065f8772faa.pdf adem.202101645.pdf 2022-02-14T09:43:03.6133557 Output 6454824 application/pdf Version of Record true This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Indentation Plastometry of Welds
spellingShingle Indentation Plastometry of Welds
HAMED Safaie
Richard Johnston
Yuchen Gu
Cameron Pleydell-Pearce
title_short Indentation Plastometry of Welds
title_full Indentation Plastometry of Welds
title_fullStr Indentation Plastometry of Welds
title_full_unstemmed Indentation Plastometry of Welds
title_sort Indentation Plastometry of Welds
author_id_str_mv 8a6186ce81e58f64f1f6877ce8595557
23282e7acce87dd926b8a62ae410a393
615b64048381eea559251d5953bb3cd6
564c480cb2abe761533a139c7dbaaca1
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8a6186ce81e58f64f1f6877ce8595557_***_HAMED Safaie
23282e7acce87dd926b8a62ae410a393_***_Richard Johnston
615b64048381eea559251d5953bb3cd6_***_Yuchen Gu
564c480cb2abe761533a139c7dbaaca1_***_Cameron Pleydell-Pearce
author HAMED Safaie
Richard Johnston
Yuchen Gu
Cameron Pleydell-Pearce
author2 Wenchen Gu
Jimmy Campbell
Yuanbo Tang
HAMED Safaie
Richard Johnston
Yuchen Gu
Cameron Pleydell-Pearce
Max Burley
James Dean
Trevor William Clyne
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container_title Advanced Engineering Materials
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container_start_page 2101645
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 1438-1656
1527-2648
doi_str_mv 10.1002/adem.202101645
publisher Wiley
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description This investigation concerns the application of the profilometry‐based indentation plastometry (PIP) methodology to obtain stress–strain relationships for material in the vicinity of fusion welds. These are produced by The Welding Institute (TWI), using submerged arc welding to join pairs of thick steel plates. The width of the welds varies from about 5 mm at the bottom to about 40–50 mm at the top. For one weld, the properties of parent and weld metal are similar, while for the other, the weld metal is significantly harder than the parent. Both weldments are shown to be approximately isotropic in terms of mechanical response, while there is a small degree of anisotropy in the parent metal (with the through‐thickness direction being slightly softer than the in‐plane directions). The PIP procedure has a high sensitivity for detecting such anisotropy. It is also shown that there is excellent agreement between stress–strain curves obtained using PIP and via conventional uniaxial testing (tensile and compressive). Finally, the PIP methodology is used to explore properties in the transition regime between weld and parent, with a lateral resolution of the order of 1–2 mm. This reveals variations on a scale that would be very difficult to examine using conventional testing.
published_date 2022-02-13T09:28:19Z
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