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Variations in COVID-19 vaccination uptake among people in receipt of psychotropic drugs: cross-sectional analysis of a national population-based prospective cohort

Siobhán Murphy Orcid Logo, Dermot O'Reilly Orcid Logo, Rhiannon Owen, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Emily Lowthian, Stuart Bedston, Fatemeh Torabi Orcid Logo, Jillian Beggs, Antony Chuter, Simon de Lusignan Orcid Logo, Richard Hobbs Orcid Logo, Chris Robertson, Srinivasa Vittal Katikireddi Orcid Logo, Aziz Sheikh Orcid Logo, Declan T. Bradley Orcid Logo

The British Journal of Psychiatry, Volume: 221, Issue: 1, Pages: 417 - 424

Swansea University Authors: Rhiannon Owen, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Emily Lowthian, Stuart Bedston, Fatemeh Torabi Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1192/bjp.2022.36

Abstract

BackgroundCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disproportionately affected people with mental health conditions.AimsWe investigated the association between receiving psychotropic drugs, as an indicator of mental health conditions, and COVID-19 vaccine uptake.MethodWe conducted a cross-sectional a...

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Published in: The British Journal of Psychiatry
ISSN: 0007-1250 1472-1465
Published: Royal College of Psychiatrists 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59519
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Abstract: BackgroundCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disproportionately affected people with mental health conditions.AimsWe investigated the association between receiving psychotropic drugs, as an indicator of mental health conditions, and COVID-19 vaccine uptake.MethodWe conducted a cross-sectional analysis of a prospective cohort of the Northern Ireland adult population using national linked primary care registration, vaccination, secondary care and pharmacy dispensing data. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses investigated the association between anxiolytic, antidepressant, antipsychotic, and hypnotic use and COVID-19 vaccination status, accounting for age, gender, deprivation and comorbidities. Receiving any COVID-19 vaccine was the primary outcome.ResultsThere were 1 433 814 individuals, of whom 1 166 917 received a COVID-19 vaccination. Psychotropic medications were dispensed to 267 049 people. In univariable analysis, people who received any psychotropic medication had greater odds of receiving COVID-19 vaccination: odds ratio (OR) = 1.42 (95% CI 1.41–1.44). However, after adjustment, psychotropic medication use was associated with reduced odds of vaccination (ORadj = 0.90, 95% CI 0.89–0.91). People who received anxiolytics (ORadj = 0.63, 95% CI 0.61–0.65), antipsychotics (ORadj = 0.75, 95% CI 0.73–0.78) and hypnotics (ORadj = 0.90, 95% CI 0.87–0.93) had reduced odds of being vaccinated. Antidepressant use was not associated with vaccination (ORadj = 1.02, 95% CI 1.00–1.03).ConclusionsWe found significantly lower odds of vaccination in people who were receiving treatment with anxiolytic and antipsychotic medications. There is an urgent need for evidence-based, tailored vaccine support for people with mental health conditions.
Keywords: Covid-19; vaccines; mental health; equity; psychotropic medicines
College: Swansea University Medical School
Funders: UK Research and Innovation (Medical Research Council); Research and Innovation Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund; Health Data Research UK
Issue: 1
Start Page: 417
End Page: 424