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SARS-CoV-2 infection risk among 77,587 healthcare workers: a national observational longitudinal cohort study in Wales, United Kingdom, April to November 2020

Joe Hollinghurst, Laura North, Tamas Szakmany, Richard Pugh, Gwyneth Davies Orcid Logo, Shanya Sivakumaran, Rebecca Jarvis, Martin Rolles, Owen Pickrell Orcid Logo, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Gareth Davies, Rowena Griffiths, Jane Lyons, Fatemeh Torabi Orcid Logo, Rich Fry Orcid Logo, Michael Gravenor Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo

Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Start page: 014107682211071

Swansea University Authors: Joe Hollinghurst, Laura North, Gwyneth Davies Orcid Logo, Shanya Sivakumaran, Owen Pickrell Orcid Logo, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Gareth Davies, Rowena Griffiths, Jane Lyons, Fatemeh Torabi Orcid Logo, Rich Fry Orcid Logo, Michael Gravenor Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo

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Abstract

ObjectivesTo better understand the risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among healthcare workers, leading to recommendations for the prioritisation of personal protective equipment, testing, training and vaccination.DesignObservational, longitudinal, nationa...

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Published in: Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
ISSN: 0141-0768 1758-1095
Published: SAGE Publications 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60146
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Abstract: ObjectivesTo better understand the risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among healthcare workers, leading to recommendations for the prioritisation of personal protective equipment, testing, training and vaccination.DesignObservational, longitudinal, national cohort study.SettingOur cohort were secondary care (hospital-based) healthcare workers employed by NHS Wales (United Kingdom) organisations from 1 April 2020 to 30 November 2020.ParticipantsWe included 577,756 monthly observations among 77,587 healthcare workers. Using linked anonymised datasets, participants were grouped into 20 staff roles. Additionally, each role was deemed either patient-facing, non-patient-facing or undetermined. This was linked to individual demographic details and dates of positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR tests.Main outcome measuresWe used univariable and multivariable logistic regression models to determine odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of a positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test.ResultsPatient-facing healthcare workers were at the highest risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection with an adjusted OR (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 2.28 (95% CI 2.10–2.47). We found that after adjustment, foundation year doctors (OR 1.83 [95% CI 1.47–2.27]), healthcare support workers [OR 1.36 [95% CI 1.20–1.54]) and hospital nurses (OR 1.27 [95% CI 1.12–1.44]) were at the highest risk of infection among all staff groups. Younger healthcare workers and those living in more deprived areas were at a higher risk of infection. We also observed that infection rates varied over time and by organisation.ConclusionsThese findings have important policy implications for the prioritisation of vaccination, testing, training and personal protective equipment provision for patient-facing roles and the higher risk staff groups.
Keywords: COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, healthcare workers, infection risk, public health
College: Swansea University Medical School
Funders: UKRI
Start Page: 014107682211071