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Feminizing effects of ethinylestradiol in roach (Rutilus rutilus) populations with different estrogenic pollution exposure histories

Patrick B. Hamilton Orcid Logo, Alice Baynes Orcid Logo, Elizabeth Nicol, Graham Harris, Tamsyn Uren Webster Orcid Logo, Nicola Beresford, Marta Straszkiewicz, Susan Jobling, Charles R. Tyler

Aquatic Toxicology, Volume: 249, Start page: 106229

Swansea University Author: Tamsyn Uren Webster Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Experimental exposures aimed at assessing the risks posed by estrogens in waste-water treatment work (WwTW) effluents to fish populations have rarely considered whether populations differ in their sensitivity to estrogenic compounds. This is despite evidence that selection at genes involved in the e...

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Published in: Aquatic Toxicology
ISSN: 0166-445X
Published: Elsevier BV 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa60309
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Abstract: Experimental exposures aimed at assessing the risks posed by estrogens in waste-water treatment work (WwTW) effluents to fish populations have rarely considered whether populations differ in their sensitivity to estrogenic compounds. This is despite evidence that selection at genes involved in the estrogen response has occurred in wild populations, and evidence that genotype can influence estrogen-response. In this study we compare the effects of a two-year exposure to a low measured concentration (1.3 ng/L) of ethinylestradiol (EE2) on the sexual development of roach (Rutilus rutilus) whose parental generation was sampled from two river stretches heavily contaminated with WwTW effluent and from two without any known WwTW effluent contamination. Exposure to EE2 significantly reduced the proportion of genetic males and induced a range of feminized phenotypes in males. Significantly, exposure also increased the proportion of genetic females with vitellogenic oocytes from 51 to 96%, raising the possibility that estrogen pollution could impact populations of annually spawning fish species through advancing female reproduction by at least a year. However, there was no evidence that river origin affected sensitivity to estrogens in either sex. Thus, we conclude that chronic exposure to low level EE2 has reproductive health outcomes for both male and female roach, but we find no evidence that the nature or magnitude of the response is affected by the population origin.
Keywords: Ecotoxicology, Endocrine disruption, Pollution, Estrogen
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: The UK Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC; NE/K004263/1)
Start Page: 106229