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Journal article 645 views

Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis

Ruth Godfrey Orcid Logo

Hemodialysis International, Volume: 11, Issue: 3, Pages: 278 - 285

Swansea University Author: Ruth Godfrey Orcid Logo

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Abstract

The current obesity epidemic throughout the western world has resulted in a considerable increase in the condition Type II diabetes mellitus. Recently, the World Health Organization has predicted that the global prevalence of Type II will increase from 175 million patients in 2003 to over 350 millio...

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Published in: Hemodialysis International
ISSN: 1492-7535 1542-4758
Published: Wiley 2007
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6121
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spelling 2020-06-19T12:06:54.1517428 v2 6121 2011-10-01 Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis b7e381bae1b3f74a3521be56c9b2d2ae 0000-0002-8830-3625 Ruth Godfrey Ruth Godfrey true false 2011-10-01 BMS The current obesity epidemic throughout the western world has resulted in a considerable increase in the condition Type II diabetes mellitus. Recently, the World Health Organization has predicted that the global prevalence of Type II will increase from 175 million patients in 2003 to over 350 million by 2030. One of the major consequences of this disorder is renal failure, which presents itself as chronic kidney disease, and can progress to end-stage renal disease. Once diagnosed, patients are generally treated using dialysis due to a shortage of kidney donors. The fundamental process of dialysis still requires improvement because the survival rate of these patients is relatively poor. This has resulted in considerable research into improvements in hemodialysis membranes, and the challenge to find more suitable marker(s) in assessing the efficacy of the dialysis process. A class of compounds highlighted as a possible accumulative toxin is advanced glycation end products or AGEs. This is an article regarding the impact of hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration on glucose and AGE levels within the body and the consequences of a chronic hyperglycemic condition. It also highlights the negative aspects of using dextrose in conventional dialysis solutions (an area that has already been identified by peritoneal dialysis clinicians as problematic). The review concludes by suggesting several possible topics of future research. Journal Article Hemodialysis International 11 3 278 285 Wiley 1492-7535 1542-4758 31 12 2007 2007-12-31 10.1111/j.1542-4758.2007.00180.x http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1542-4758.2007.00180.x/full COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University 2020-06-19T12:06:54.1517428 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 Swansea University Medical School Medicine Ruth Godfrey 0000-0002-8830-3625 1
title Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis
spellingShingle Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis
Ruth Godfrey
title_short Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis
title_full Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis
title_fullStr Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis
title_full_unstemmed Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis
title_sort Impact of glucose levels on advanced glycation end products in hemodialysis
author_id_str_mv b7e381bae1b3f74a3521be56c9b2d2ae
author_id_fullname_str_mv b7e381bae1b3f74a3521be56c9b2d2ae_***_Ruth Godfrey
author Ruth Godfrey
author2 Ruth Godfrey
format Journal article
container_title Hemodialysis International
container_volume 11
container_issue 3
container_start_page 278
publishDate 2007
institution Swansea University
issn 1492-7535
1542-4758
doi_str_mv 10.1111/j.1542-4758.2007.00180.x
publisher Wiley
college_str Swansea University Medical School
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_top_title Swansea University Medical School
hierarchy_parent_id swanseauniversitymedicalschool
hierarchy_parent_title Swansea University Medical School
department_str Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School{{{_:::_}}}Medicine
url http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1542-4758.2007.00180.x/full
document_store_str 0
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description The current obesity epidemic throughout the western world has resulted in a considerable increase in the condition Type II diabetes mellitus. Recently, the World Health Organization has predicted that the global prevalence of Type II will increase from 175 million patients in 2003 to over 350 million by 2030. One of the major consequences of this disorder is renal failure, which presents itself as chronic kidney disease, and can progress to end-stage renal disease. Once diagnosed, patients are generally treated using dialysis due to a shortage of kidney donors. The fundamental process of dialysis still requires improvement because the survival rate of these patients is relatively poor. This has resulted in considerable research into improvements in hemodialysis membranes, and the challenge to find more suitable marker(s) in assessing the efficacy of the dialysis process. A class of compounds highlighted as a possible accumulative toxin is advanced glycation end products or AGEs. This is an article regarding the impact of hemodialysis and hemodiafiltration on glucose and AGE levels within the body and the consequences of a chronic hyperglycemic condition. It also highlights the negative aspects of using dextrose in conventional dialysis solutions (an area that has already been identified by peritoneal dialysis clinicians as problematic). The review concludes by suggesting several possible topics of future research.
published_date 2007-12-31T03:20:12Z
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