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Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean

Graeme Hays, Victoria Hobson, Julian D Metcalfe, David Righton, David W Sims

Ecology, Volume: 87, Issue: 10, Pages: 2647 - 2656

Swansea University Authors: Graeme Hays, Victoria Hobson

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Abstract

Some marine species have been shown to target foraging at particular hotspots of high prey abundance. However, we show here that in the year after a nesting season, female leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the Atlantic generally spend relatively little time in fixed hotspots, especially...

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Published in: Ecology
ISSN: 0012-9658
Published: 2006
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6130
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spelling 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 v2 6130 2011-10-01 Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean e40f098395f86f19debb12442dd95ac3 Graeme Hays Graeme Hays true false 9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37 Victoria Hobson Victoria Hobson true false 2011-10-01 SBI Some marine species have been shown to target foraging at particular hotspots of high prey abundance. However, we show here that in the year after a nesting season, female leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the Atlantic generally spend relatively little time in fixed hotspots, especially those with a surface signature revealed in satellite imagery, but rather tend to have a pattern of near continuous traveling. Associated with this traveling, distinct changes in dive behavior indicate that turtles constantly fine tune their foraging behavior and diel activity patterns in association with local conditions. Switches between nocturnal vs. diurnal activity are rare in the animal kingdom but may be essential for survival on a diet of gelatinous zooplankton where patches of high prey availability are rare. These results indicate that in their first year after nesting, leatherback turtles do not fit the general model of migration where responses to resources are suppressed during transit. However, their behavior may be different in their sabbatical years away from nesting beaches. Our results highlight the importance of whole-ocean fishing gear regulations to minimize turtle bycatch. Journal Article Ecology 87 10 2647 2656 0012-9658 31 12 2006 2006-12-31 10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[2647:FFMOLT]2.0.CO;2 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 2011-10-01T00:00:00.0000000 College of Science Biosciences Graeme Hays 1 Victoria Hobson 2 Julian D Metcalfe 3 David Righton 4 David W Sims 5
title Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean
spellingShingle Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean
Graeme Hays
Victoria Hobson
title_short Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean
title_full Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean
title_fullStr Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean
title_full_unstemmed Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean
title_sort Flexible foraging movements of leatherback turtles across the north Atlantic Ocean
author_id_str_mv e40f098395f86f19debb12442dd95ac3
9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37
author_id_fullname_str_mv e40f098395f86f19debb12442dd95ac3_***_Graeme Hays
9024f9f0a80d2d248c7c6efb2e715c37_***_Victoria Hobson
author Graeme Hays
Victoria Hobson
author2 Graeme Hays
Victoria Hobson
Julian D Metcalfe
David Righton
David W Sims
format Journal article
container_title Ecology
container_volume 87
container_issue 10
container_start_page 2647
publishDate 2006
institution Swansea University
issn 0012-9658
doi_str_mv 10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[2647:FFMOLT]2.0.CO;2
college_str College of Science
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Some marine species have been shown to target foraging at particular hotspots of high prey abundance. However, we show here that in the year after a nesting season, female leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the Atlantic generally spend relatively little time in fixed hotspots, especially those with a surface signature revealed in satellite imagery, but rather tend to have a pattern of near continuous traveling. Associated with this traveling, distinct changes in dive behavior indicate that turtles constantly fine tune their foraging behavior and diel activity patterns in association with local conditions. Switches between nocturnal vs. diurnal activity are rare in the animal kingdom but may be essential for survival on a diet of gelatinous zooplankton where patches of high prey availability are rare. These results indicate that in their first year after nesting, leatherback turtles do not fit the general model of migration where responses to resources are suppressed during transit. However, their behavior may be different in their sabbatical years away from nesting beaches. Our results highlight the importance of whole-ocean fishing gear regulations to minimize turtle bycatch.
published_date 2006-12-31T03:16:15Z
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score 10.89855