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Impact of ActiGraph sampling rate on free-living physical activity measurement in youth

Kimberly A Clevenger Orcid Logo, Jan Christian Brønd Orcid Logo, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Karin A Pfeiffer Orcid Logo, Alexander H K Montoye, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

Physiological Measurement, Volume: 43, Issue: 10

Swansea University Authors: Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 22nd September 2023

Abstract

ActiGraph sampling frequencies of more than 30 Hz may result in overestimation of activity counts in both children and adults, but research on free-living individuals has not included the range of sampling frequencies used by researchers. Objective: We compared count- and raw-acceleration-based metr...

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Published in: Physiological Measurement
ISSN: 0967-3334 1361-6579
Published: IOP Publishing 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61301
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Abstract: ActiGraph sampling frequencies of more than 30 Hz may result in overestimation of activity counts in both children and adults, but research on free-living individuals has not included the range of sampling frequencies used by researchers. Objective: We compared count- and raw-acceleration-based metrics from free-living children and adolescents across a range of sampling frequencies. Approach: Participants (n=445; 10-15 y) wore an ActiGraph accelerometer for at least one 10-h day. Vector Magnitude counts, Mean Amplitude Deviation, Monitor-Independent Movement Summary units, and activity intensity classified using six methods (four cut-points, two-regression model, and artificial neural network) were compared between 30 Hz and 60, 80, 90, and 100 Hz sampling frequencies using mean absolute differences, correlations, and equivalence testing. Main results: All outcomes were statistically equivalent, and correlation coefficients were ≥0.970. Absolute differences were largest for the 30 vs. 80 and 30 vs. 100 Hz count comparisons. For comparisons of 30 with 60, 80, 90, or 100 Hz, mean (and maximum) absolute differences in minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 (0.4 to 1.5), 0.3 to 1.3 (1.6 to 8.6), 0.1 to 0.3 (1.1 to 2.5), and 0.3 to 2.5 (1.6 to 14.3) across the six classification methods. Significance: Acceleration-based outcomes are comparable across the full range of sampling rates and therefore recommended for future research. If using counts, we recommend a multiple of 30 Hz because using a 100 Hz sampling rate resulted in large maximum individual differences and epoch-level differences, and increasing differences with activity level.
Keywords: Accelerometer, methodology, signal processing, sampling frequency, youth, pediatric
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Issue: 10