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Personal and societal costs of multiple sclerosis in the UK: A population-based MS Registry study

Richard Nicholas, Martin Heaven, Rod Middleton Orcid Logo, Manoj Chevli, Ruth Pulikottil-Jacob, Kerina Jones Orcid Logo, David Ford Orcid Logo

Multiple Sclerosis Journal - Experimental, Translational and Clinical, Volume: 6, Issue: 1, Start page: 205521732090172

Swansea University Authors: Richard Nicholas, Martin Heaven, Rod Middleton Orcid Logo, Kerina Jones Orcid Logo, David Ford Orcid Logo

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Abstract

ObjectivesTo investigate through survey and data linkage, healthcare resource use and costs (except drugs), including who bears the cost, of multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom by disease severity and type.MethodsThe United Kingdom Multiple Sclerosis Register deployed a cost of illness survey,...

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Published in: Multiple Sclerosis Journal - Experimental, Translational and Clinical
ISSN: 2055-2173 2055-2173
Published: SAGE Publications 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61478
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Abstract: ObjectivesTo investigate through survey and data linkage, healthcare resource use and costs (except drugs), including who bears the cost, of multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom by disease severity and type.MethodsThe United Kingdom Multiple Sclerosis Register deployed a cost of illness survey, completed by people with multiple sclerosis and linked this with data within the United Kingdom Multiple Sclerosis Register and from their hospital records. Resource consumption was categorised as being medical or non-medical and costed by National Health Service and social services estimates for 2018.ResultsWe calculated £509,003 in non-medical costs over a year and £435,488 in medical costs generated over 3 months. People with multiple sclerosis reported self-funding 75% of non-medical costs with non-medical interventions having long-term potential benefits. Costs increased with disability as measured by patient-reported Expanded Disability Status Score and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale, with Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale physical being a more powerful predictor of costs than the patient-reported Expanded Disability Status Score. Two distinct groups were identified: medical and non-medical interventions (n = 138); and medical interventions only (n = 399). The medical and non-medical group reported increased disease severity and reduced employment but incurred 80% more medical costs per person than the medical-only group.ConclusionsThe importance of disability in driving costs is illustrated with balance between medical and non-medical costs consistent with the United Kingdom health environment. People with multiple sclerosis and their families fund a considerable proportion of non-medical costs but non-medical interventions with longer term impact could affect future medical costs.
Keywords: Resource use; medical and non-medical costing; multiple sclerosis; disability; UKMS register
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Issue: 1
Start Page: 205521732090172