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Comparative risk of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) following COVID-19 vaccination or infection: A national cohort study using linked electronic health records

Columbus Ohaeri Orcid Logo, Daniel Rhys Thomas Orcid Logo, Jane Salmon, Simon Cottrell, Jane Lyons, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Fatemeh Torabi Orcid Logo, Gareth Davies Orcid Logo, Christopher Williams Orcid Logo

Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics, Volume: 18, Issue: 6

Swansea University Authors: Jane Lyons, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo, Fatemeh Torabi Orcid Logo, Gareth Davies Orcid Logo

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Abstract

To inform the public and policy makers, we investigated and compared the risk of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after SARS-Cov-2 vaccination or infection using a national cohort of 2,643,699 individuals aged 17 y and above, alive, and resident in Wales on 1 January 2020 followed up through...

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Published in: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics
ISSN: 2164-5515 2164-554X
Published: Informa UK Limited 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa61672
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Abstract: To inform the public and policy makers, we investigated and compared the risk of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) after SARS-Cov-2 vaccination or infection using a national cohort of 2,643,699 individuals aged 17 y and above, alive, and resident in Wales on 1 January 2020 followed up through multiple linked data sources until 28 March 2021. Exposures were first dose of Oxford-ChAdOx1 or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine or polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed SARS-Cov-2 infection. The outcome was an incident record of CVST. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using multivariable Cox regression, adjusted for confounders. HR from SARS-Cov-2 infection was compared with that for SARS-Cov-2 vaccination. We identified 910,556 (34.4%) records of first SARS-Cov-2 vaccination and 165,862 (6.3%) of SARS-Cov-2 infection. A total of 1,372 CVST events were recorded during the study period, of which 52 (3.8%) and 48 (3.5%) occurred within 28 d after vaccination and infection, respectively. We observed slight non-significant risk of CVST within 28 d of vaccination [aHR: 1.34, 95% CI: 0.95-1.90], which remained after stratifying by vaccine [BNT162b2, aHR: 1.18 (95% CI: 0.63-2.21); ChAdOx1, aHR: 1.40 (95% CI: 0.95-2.05)]. Three times the number of CVST events is observed within 28 d of a positive SARS-Cov-2 test [aHR: 3.02 (95% CI: 2.17-4.21)]. The risk of CVST following SARS-Cov-2 infection is 2.3 times that following SARS-Cov-2 vaccine. This is important information both for those designing COVID-19 vaccination programs and for individuals making their own informed decisions on the risk-benefit of vaccination. This record-linkage approach will be useful in monitoring the safety of future vaccine programs.
Item Description: Availability of data and materials:The data used in this study are available in the SAIL Databank at Swansea University, Swansea, UK, but as restrictions apply they are only available to bona fide researchers. All proposals to use SAIL data are subject to review by an independent Information Governance Review Panel (IGRP). Before any data can be accessed, approval must be given by the IGRP. The IGRP gives careful consideration to each project to ensure proper and appropriate use of SAIL data. When access has been granted, it is gained through a privacy protecting safe haven and remote access system referred to as the SAIL Gateway. SAIL has established an application process to be followed by anyone who would like to access data via SAIL at https://www.saildatabank.com/application-process
Keywords: COVID19; coronavirus; vaccines; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; cerebral venous thrombosis
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Funders: This work was supported by the Con-COV team funded by the Medical Research Council (grant number: MR/V028367/1). This work was also supported by Health Data Research UK, which receives its funding from HDR UK Ltd (HDR-9006) funded by the UK Medical Research Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, Economic and Social Research Council, Department of Health and Social Care (England), Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates, Health and Social Care Research and Development Division (Welsh Government), Public Health Agency (Northern Ireland), British Heart Foundation (BHF), and the Wellcome Trust. This work was also supported by the ADR Wales program of work. The ADR Wales program of work is aligned to the priority themes as identified in the Welsh Government’s national strategy: Prosperity for All. ADR Wales brings together data science experts at Swansea University Medical School, staff from the Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) at Cardiff University and specialist teams within the Welsh Government to develop new evidence that supports Prosperity for All by using the SAIL Databank at Swansea University, to link and analyze anonymized data. ADR Wales is part of the Economic and Social Research Council (part of UK Research and Innovation) funded by ADR UK (grant ES/S007393/1). This work was further supported by the Wales COVID-19 Evidence Centre, funded by Health and Care Research Wales. Public Health Wales, UKRI-Medical Research Council (MR/V028367/1), UKRI-Economic and Social Research Council (ES/S007393/1).
Issue: 6