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You'll never walk alone: Loneliness, religion, and politico‐economic transformation

Annie Tubadji Orcid Logo

Politics and Policy, Volume: 51, Issue: 4

Swansea University Author: Annie Tubadji Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/polp.12538

Abstract

The rise of subversive religious beliefs has been recently documented as related to politico-economic radicalization of places that feel left behind. When is the traditional local religious institution so socio-economically inefficient in providing hope for ‘not walking alone’ to become substituted...

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Published in: Politics and Policy
ISSN: 1555-5623 1747-1346
Published: Wiley
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa62605
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Abstract: The rise of subversive religious beliefs has been recently documented as related to politico-economic radicalization of places that feel left behind. When is the traditional local religious institution so socio-economically inefficient in providing hope for ‘not walking alone’ to become substituted by subversive religious beliefs on the market for hope? This paper suggests a detailed methodology, linking micro and macro levels, that starts from the quantification of the individual gain from religion as a source for well-being by providing the feeling of “not walking alone”. This micro gain is next used: (i) to evaluate a religious institution in terms of the social welfare that it generates, and (ii) to monitor this religious institution for losing its market to subversive religious beliefs, related to radical politico-economic transformations. To illustrate this methodology, the paper analyses the socio-economic efficiency of the Church of England as a predictive tool for the Brexit-vote.
Keywords: Religion, loneliness, relative deprivation, social gain from religious institutions, institutional efficiency, political transformation
College: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Funders: Swansea University
Issue: 4