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Responses of coastal sediment organic and inorganic carbon to habitat modification across a wide latitudinal range in southeastern China

Yan Hong, Linhai Zhang, Ping Yang Orcid Logo, Chuan Tong, Yongxin Lin, Derrick Y. F. Lai, Hong Yang, Yalian Tian, Wanyi Zhu, Kam Tang Orcid Logo

CATENA, Volume: 225, Start page: 107034

Swansea University Author: Kam Tang Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Coastal wetlands are important to the global carbon (C) budget and climate regulation. Plant invasion and aquaculture reclamation have drastically transformed China’s coastal wetlands, but knowledge of the effects on sediment carbon remains limited. We sampled top layer sediments (0–20 cm) in 21 coa...

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Published in: CATENA
ISSN: 0341-8162
Published: Elsevier BV 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa62691
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Abstract: Coastal wetlands are important to the global carbon (C) budget and climate regulation. Plant invasion and aquaculture reclamation have drastically transformed China’s coastal wetlands, but knowledge of the effects on sediment carbon remains limited. We sampled top layer sediments (0–20 cm) in 21 coastal wetlands in southeastern China across the tropical-subtropical climate gradient, that have experienced the same sequence of habitat transformation from native mudflats (MFs) to Spartina alterniflora marshes (SAs) then to aquaculture ponds (APs). We measured the sediment carbon contents and ancillary physicochemical parameters. Landscape change from MFs to SAs increased sediment organic carbon (SOC) but decreased sediment inorganic carbon (SIC) content, whereas conversion of SAs to APs resulted in the opposite changes. Based on stepwise regression analysis, ammonium concentration and particle size distribution were the common factors that affected changes in SOC between habitat types, whereas for SIC it was ammonium and chloride concentrations. Habitat change affected SOC to a larger degree than SIC. Overall, invasion of MFs by SAs increased total carbon storage in the top sediment by 22%, or 6.6×106 g C ha-1; conversion of SAs to APs decreased it by 9.7%, or 3.5×106 g C ha-1. Our results showed the differential effects of different habitat modification scenarios on the sediment carbon pools and help assess how landscape-scale change affects terrestrial carbon budget and emission in the context of global climate change.
Keywords: Sediment organic carbon (SOC); Sediment inorganic carbon (SIC); Coastal wetland; Invasive plants; Aquaculture reclamation; Carbon storage
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Start Page: 107034