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Variable responses of mineral-bound soil organic carbon to land cover change in southern China’s coastal wetlands

Ping Yang Orcid Logo, Guanpeng Chen, Linhai Zhang, Chuan Tong, Hong Yang, Wanyi Zhu, Dongyao Sun Orcid Logo, Lishan Tan Orcid Logo, Yan Hong, Kam Tang Orcid Logo

CATENA, Volume: 242, Start page: 108129

Swansea University Author: Kam Tang Orcid Logo

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Abstract

The formation of mineral-bound organic carbon (OC) complexes is important for the long-term preservation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in wetlands. Many coastal wetlands globally have been threatened by plant invasion and land development, but information on the effects on mineral-bound OC is limited...

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Published in: CATENA
ISSN: 0341-8162
Published: Elsevier BV 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa66538
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Abstract: The formation of mineral-bound organic carbon (OC) complexes is important for the long-term preservation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in wetlands. Many coastal wetlands globally have been threatened by plant invasion and land development, but information on the effects on mineral-bound OC is limited. We measured the soil contents of Ca-OC, Fe(Al)–OC and residual OC across 21 coastal wetlands in southern China that have gone through the same sequence of land cover change, from native mudflats (MFs) to Spartina alterniflora marshes (SAs) then to earthen aquaculture ponds (APs). Residual-OC was the main component of SOC (74.1–78.2 %), followed by Fe(Al)–OC (18.4–22.8 %) and Ca-OC (<3.5 %). All three components in the soil increased when MFs were converted to SAs, but decreased in subsequent conversion of SAs to APs. Land cover change affected Fe(Al)–OC the most, but SOC storage increased more strongly with increasing Ca-OC. Nitrogen supply in the form of NH4+-N and clay content both positively affected the changes in mineral-bound OC. Our results suggest that different land cover change scenarios had different effects on the amounts of mineral-bound OC and their liability to microbial turnover, resulting in different degrees of SOC preservation and carbon emissions.
Keywords: Soil organic carbon stability, Mineral-bound OC, Chemical protection, Coastal wetland, Habitat change
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: The study was funded by the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province (No. 2021 J01178, 2022R1002006), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41801070, 41671088), and the Minjiang Scholar Programme.
Start Page: 108129