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No differences in knee joint loading between individuals who had a medial or lateral meniscectomy: An ancillary study

Chelsea Starbuck Orcid Logo, Vanessa Walters, Lee Herrington, Bilal Barkatali, Richard Jones

The Knee, Volume: 42, Pages: 304 - 311

Swansea University Author: Chelsea Starbuck Orcid Logo

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Abstract

BackgroundArthroscopic partial meniscectomy is a frequently undertaken procedure for traumatic meniscal injuries. The location of knee joint degeneration and long-term prognosis differs between knees who have had a medial or lateral meniscectomy. However, there is no evidence comparing knee loading...

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Published in: The Knee
ISSN: 0968-0160
Published: Elsevier BV 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa63339
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Abstract: BackgroundArthroscopic partial meniscectomy is a frequently undertaken procedure for traumatic meniscal injuries. The location of knee joint degeneration and long-term prognosis differs between knees who have had a medial or lateral meniscectomy. However, there is no evidence comparing knee loading following a medial or lateral meniscectomy during sporting tasks. This study compared knee loading during walking and running between individuals who either had a medial or lateral meniscectomy. Methods Knee kinematic and kinetic data were collected during walking and running in individuals three to twelve months post-surgery. Participants were grouped according to the location of surgery (medial, n=12, and lateral, n=16). An independent t-test compared knee biomechanics between the groups and Hedge’s g effects sizes were also conducted. Results External knee adduction and knee flexion moments were similar between groups for walking and running with negligible to small effect sizes (effect size, 0.08–0.30). Kinematic (effect size, 0.03-0.22) and spatiotemporal (effect size, 0.02-0.59) outcomes were also similar between the groups. Conclusions The lack of differences in surrogate knee loading variables between medial and lateral meniscectomy groups was unexpected. These findings suggest that combining groups in the short-term period following surgery is applicable. However, the data presented in this study cannot explain the differences in long-term prognosis between medial and lateral meniscectomies.
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: Manchester Institute of Health and Performance
Start Page: 304
End Page: 311