No Cover Image

Journal article 95 views 23 downloads

Knee Offloading by Patients During Walking and Running After Meniscectomy

Chelsea Starbuck Orcid Logo, Vanessa Walters, Lee Herrington, Bilal Barkatali, Richard Jones

Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume: 12, Issue: 3

Swansea University Author: Chelsea Starbuck Orcid Logo

  • 66218.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    Copyright: The Author(s) 2024. This open-access article is published and distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial - No Derivatives License.

    Download (670.57KB)

Abstract

Background:Changes in knee loading have been reported after meniscectomy. Knee loading has previously been assessed during jogging and treadmill running rather than overground running, which could give altered results.Purpose/Hypothesis:The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee function during...

Full description

Published in: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
ISSN: 2325-9671 2325-9671
Published: SAGE Publications 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa66218
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Background:Changes in knee loading have been reported after meniscectomy. Knee loading has previously been assessed during jogging and treadmill running rather than overground running, which could give altered results.Purpose/Hypothesis:The purpose of this study was to evaluate knee function during overground running and walking after meniscectomy. It was hypothesized that the affected limb would demonstrate higher external knee adduction moment, lower knee flexion moment (KFM), and lower knee rotation moment (KRM) compared with the contralateral limb and with healthy individuals.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Kinematic and kinetic data were collected during running and walking in individuals after a meniscectomy and healthy individuals. Total knee joint moments (TKJM) were calculated from the sagittal, frontal, and transverse knee moments. Isometric quadriceps strength, perceived knee function, and kinesiophobia were also assessed. A mixed linear model compared differences between the affected leg, the contralateral leg, and the healthy leg.Results:Data were collected on 20 healthy individuals and 30 individuals after a meniscectomy (mean ± SD, 5.7 ± 2.9 months postsurgery), with 12, 16, and 2 individuals who had medial, lateral, and both medial and lateral meniscectomy, respectively. The affected limb demonstrated lower TKJM (P < .001), KFM (P = .004), and KRM (P < .001) during late stance of walking compared with the healthy group. Lower TKJM and KFM were observed during running in the affected limb compared with the contralateral limb and healthy group. No significant differences were observed between contralateral and healthy limbs except for KRM during late stance of walking. Lower quadriceps strength was observed in the affected (P < .001) and contralateral limbs (P = .001) compared with the healthy group. Individuals after a meniscectomy also reported greater kinesiophobia (P = .006) and lower perceived knee function (31.1%; P < .001) compared with the healthy group.Conclusion:After meniscectomy, individuals who sustained a traumatic meniscal injury showed lower TKJM in the affected limb compared with the contralateral limb and healthy individuals. This decrease in TKJM can be attributed to altered knee-loading strategies in the sagittal and transverse planes.Clinical Relevance:Improving movement strategies, quadriceps strength, and kinesiophobia through rehabilitation approaches will allow individuals to load their knee appropriately when returning to sport.
Keywords: meniscal injuries; running; walking; knee kinetics; total knee joint loading
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: University of Salford
Issue: 3