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Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal

Monil Khera, Kevin Arbuckle Orcid Logo, Francis Mwanguhya, Solomon Kyabulima, Kenneth Mwesige, Robert Businge, Jonathan D. Blount Orcid Logo, Michael A. Cant Orcid Logo, Hazel Nichols Orcid Logo

Biology Letters, Volume: 19, Issue: 11

Swansea University Authors: Monil Khera, Kevin Arbuckle Orcid Logo, Hazel Nichols Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1098/rsbl.2023.0328

Abstract

Human-induced climate change is leading to temperature rises, along with increases in the frequency and intensity of heatwaves. Many animals respond to high temperatures through behavioural thermoregulation, for example by resting in the shade, but this may impose opportunity costs by reducing forag...

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Published in: Biology Letters
ISSN: 1744-957X
Published: The Royal Society 2023
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65082
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spelling v2 65082 2023-11-23 Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal a63ca0b621b2f2b8d19f13db3f86b57f Monil Khera Monil Khera true false d1775d20b12e430869cc7be5d7d4a27e 0000-0002-9171-5874 Kevin Arbuckle Kevin Arbuckle true false 43ba12986bd7754484874c73eed0ebfe 0000-0002-4455-6065 Hazel Nichols Hazel Nichols true false 2023-11-23 MTLS Human-induced climate change is leading to temperature rises, along with increases in the frequency and intensity of heatwaves. Many animals respond to high temperatures through behavioural thermoregulation, for example by resting in the shade, but this may impose opportunity costs by reducing foraging time (therefore energy supply), and so may be most effective when food is abundant. However, the heat dissipation limit (HDL) theory proposes that even when energy supply is plentiful, high temperatures can still have negative effects. This is because dissipating excess heat becomes harder, which limits processes that generate heat such as lactation. We tested predictions from HDL on a wild, equatorial population of banded mongooses (Mungos mungo). In support of the HDL theory, higher ambient temperatures led to lighter pups, and increasing food availability made little difference to pup weight under hotter conditions. This suggests that direct physiological constraints rather than opportunity costs of behavioural thermoregulation explain the negative impact of high temperatures on pup growth. Our results indicate that climate change may be particularly important for equatorial species, which often experience high temperatures year-round so cannot time reproduction to coincide with cooler conditions. Journal Article Biology Letters 19 11 The Royal Society 1744-957X Heat dissipation limit theory, climate change, equatorial, thermoregulation, banded mongoose, cooperative breeder 22 11 2023 2023-11-22 10.1098/rsbl.2023.0328 http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2023.0328 COLLEGE NANME Materials Science and Engineering COLLEGE CODE MTLS Swansea University SU Library paid the OA fee (TA Institutional Deal) This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council (grant no. NE/N011171/1) and the European Research Council (grant no. 309249). H.J.N. was supported by an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Research Fellowship. 2023-12-19T11:24:40.7522409 2023-11-23T12:48:02.6430441 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences Monil Khera 1 Kevin Arbuckle 0000-0002-9171-5874 2 Francis Mwanguhya 3 Solomon Kyabulima 4 Kenneth Mwesige 5 Robert Businge 6 Jonathan D. Blount 0000-0002-0016-0130 7 Michael A. Cant 0000-0002-1530-3077 8 Hazel Nichols 0000-0002-4455-6065 9 65082__29238__35abfdc9da074a5bae7b28e34ba2d36b.pdf 65082.pdf 2023-12-08T16:09:43.2051574 Output 533490 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2023 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited. true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal
spellingShingle Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal
Monil Khera
Kevin Arbuckle
Hazel Nichols
title_short Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal
title_full Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal
title_fullStr Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal
title_full_unstemmed Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal
title_sort Small increases in ambient temperature reduce offspring body mass in an equatorial mammal
author_id_str_mv a63ca0b621b2f2b8d19f13db3f86b57f
d1775d20b12e430869cc7be5d7d4a27e
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author_id_fullname_str_mv a63ca0b621b2f2b8d19f13db3f86b57f_***_Monil Khera
d1775d20b12e430869cc7be5d7d4a27e_***_Kevin Arbuckle
43ba12986bd7754484874c73eed0ebfe_***_Hazel Nichols
author Monil Khera
Kevin Arbuckle
Hazel Nichols
author2 Monil Khera
Kevin Arbuckle
Francis Mwanguhya
Solomon Kyabulima
Kenneth Mwesige
Robert Businge
Jonathan D. Blount
Michael A. Cant
Hazel Nichols
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container_title Biology Letters
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container_issue 11
publishDate 2023
institution Swansea University
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doi_str_mv 10.1098/rsbl.2023.0328
publisher The Royal Society
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department_str School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2023.0328
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description Human-induced climate change is leading to temperature rises, along with increases in the frequency and intensity of heatwaves. Many animals respond to high temperatures through behavioural thermoregulation, for example by resting in the shade, but this may impose opportunity costs by reducing foraging time (therefore energy supply), and so may be most effective when food is abundant. However, the heat dissipation limit (HDL) theory proposes that even when energy supply is plentiful, high temperatures can still have negative effects. This is because dissipating excess heat becomes harder, which limits processes that generate heat such as lactation. We tested predictions from HDL on a wild, equatorial population of banded mongooses (Mungos mungo). In support of the HDL theory, higher ambient temperatures led to lighter pups, and increasing food availability made little difference to pup weight under hotter conditions. This suggests that direct physiological constraints rather than opportunity costs of behavioural thermoregulation explain the negative impact of high temperatures on pup growth. Our results indicate that climate change may be particularly important for equatorial species, which often experience high temperatures year-round so cannot time reproduction to coincide with cooler conditions.
published_date 2023-11-22T11:24:41Z
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