No Cover Image

Journal article 178 views 18 downloads

Understanding the spatial dimension of youth intergroup contact in a postaccord society.

Pier-Luc Dupont Picard Orcid Logo, Shazza Ali, David Manley, Christoph Daniel Schaefer, Laura K. Taylor, Shelley McKeown

Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology

Swansea University Author: Pier-Luc Dupont Picard Orcid Logo

  • 65164.VOR.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This article has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.

    Download (257.9KB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1037/pac0000719

Abstract

Understanding how to promote better social relations between groups in divided societies is vital for peacebuilding efforts. Building on the substantial body of research on intergroup contact theory and everyday multiculturalism, the present research aimed to examine how youth in the socially divide...

Full description

Published in: Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology
ISSN: 1078-1919 1532-7949
Published: American Psychological Association (APA) 2024
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa65164
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Understanding how to promote better social relations between groups in divided societies is vital for peacebuilding efforts. Building on the substantial body of research on intergroup contact theory and everyday multiculturalism, the present research aimed to examine how youth in the socially divided society of Belfast, Northern Ireland, experience social interactions in everyday urban spaces. Ten youth aged 16-18 (n = 2 Protestant female, 1 Protestant male, 4 Catholic female, 2 Catholic male and 1 mixed religious background male) were recruited to take part in the research. Everyday contact experiences were explored using photovoice, a participatory method. Following engagement with a series of photography workshops and tasks, youth took part in focus group discussions and later, walking interviews (n = 3) to discuss the factors that influence their social interactions. Five main themes to explain youth contact experiences in context were uncovered: geographical and socio-economic constraints on space use; group-based spatial cognitions, emotions, and behaviour; lived experience and social discourses; markers of identity; and intergroup norms. Taken together, findings highlight key individual and structural processes through which public spaces become used or not by young people from different community backgrounds. Implications for research and practice for promoting intergroup contact and peace in socially divided societies are discussed.
Keywords: youth, intergroup contact, public space, place identity, photovoice
College: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Funders: This work was supported by funding obtained from the Economic and Social Research Council (ES/T014709/1 to Shelley McKeown).