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Vegetation Trend Detection Using Time Series Satellite Data as Ecosystem Condition Indicators for Analysis in the Northwestern Highlands of Ethiopia

Bireda Alemayehu Orcid Logo, Juan Suarez-Minguez, Jacqueline Rosette Orcid Logo, Saeed A. Khan Orcid Logo

Remote Sensing, Volume: 15, Issue: 20, Start page: 5032

Swansea University Author: Jacqueline Rosette Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/rs15205032

Abstract

Vegetation is an essential component of the terrestrial ecosystem and has changed significantly over the last two decades in the Northwestern Highlands of Ethiopia. However, previous studies have focused on the detection of bitemporal change and lacked the incorporation of entire vegetation time ser...

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Published in: Remote Sensing
ISSN: 2072-4292
Published: MDPI AG 2023
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa66241
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Abstract: Vegetation is an essential component of the terrestrial ecosystem and has changed significantly over the last two decades in the Northwestern Highlands of Ethiopia. However, previous studies have focused on the detection of bitemporal change and lacked the incorporation of entire vegetation time series changes, which are considered significant indicators of ecosystem conditions. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series dataset from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an efficient method for analyzing the dynamics of vegetation change over a lengthy period using remote sensing techniques. This study aimed to utilize time series satellite data to detect vegetation changes from 2000 to 2020 and investigate their links with ecosystem conditions. The time-series satellite processing package (TIMESAT) was used to estimate the seasonal parameter values of NDVI and their correlation across the seasons during the study period. Break Detection for Additive Season and Trend (BFAST) was applied to identify the year of breakpoints, the direction of magnitude, and the number of breakpoints. The results were reported, analyzed, and linked to ecosystem conditions. The overall trend in the study area increased from 0.58 (2000–2004) to 0.65 (2015–2020). As a result, ecosystem condition indicators such as peak value (PV), base value (BV), amplitude (Amp), and large integral (LI) exhibited significant positive trends, particularly for Acacia decurrens plantations, Eucalyptus plantations, and grasslands, but phenology indicator parameters such as start of season (SOS), end of season (EOS), and length of season (LOS) did not show significant trends for almost any vegetation type. The most abrupt changes were recorded in 2015 (24.7%), 2012 (18.6%), and 2014 (9.8%). Approximately 30% of the vegetation changes were positive in magnitude. The results of this study imply that there was an improvement in the ecosystem’s condition following the establishment of the Acacia decurrens plantation. The findings are considered relevant inputs for policymakers and serve as an initial stage for the assessment of the other environmental and climatic implications of Acacia decurrens plantations at the local scale.
Keywords: BFAST; ecosystem condition; Fagita Lekoma; TIMESAT; time series; vegetation trend
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering
Funders: This research received no external funding.
Issue: 20
Start Page: 5032