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Nursing management and leadership in Turkish hospitals: modernization and professionalism in a changing healthcare system / ZULEYHA INCEOZ

Swansea University Author: ZULEYHA INCEOZ

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DOI (Published version): 10.23889/SUthesis.66307

Abstract

Research suggests that hospital nursing managers in many Western countries are gaining influence in mulidisciplinary team decision-making, and oCen work in hybrid roles that combine clinical and management duties. This study examines nurse management in Türkiye, a country where medical professionals...

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Published: Swansea, Wales, UK 2024
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
Supervisor: Rea, David ; Willson, Alan
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa66307
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Abstract: Research suggests that hospital nursing managers in many Western countries are gaining influence in mulidisciplinary team decision-making, and oCen work in hybrid roles that combine clinical and management duties. This study examines nurse management in Türkiye, a country where medical professionals have traditionally exercised tight control over the hospital division of labour, to see whether nurse managers there are moving in a similar direction.Qualitative interviews were conducted with nurse managers and staff nurses (n = 40) from five university, MoH or city hospitals in Istanbul. Interviewees were asked about their perceptions of the state of nursing management, ideas about the form nurse management and leadership should take, and views about facilitators of improvement and barriers to change. Although Turkish healthcare underwent comprehensive reform in the early 2000s, including increased emphasis on new public management-style tools such as audit, only a few nurses (the “bureaucratic modernisers”) wanted more involvement in audit and performance review. Instead, the majority of managers and staff nurses who desired change in current practice (the “professional modernisers”) described a nurse leadership role that stressed improved patient care, evidence-based practice, and continuing professional education. This contrasted with the view of minorities who were more wedded to the existing system (the “civil service traditionalists”), or who adopted an instrumental orientation to their job (the “self-serving pragmatists”).Generally, nurses saw liXle prospect of progress towards the forms of nurse leadership they desired because of the constraints imposed by the existing hospital culture and paXerns of communication, both of which they linked to medical power and the mindset that came with nurses’ status as civil servants. Progress made by the “professional modernisers” to date was confined to limited education and teambuilding sessions, and the construction of forms of collegial nursing practice in certain closed locales where doctor power did not intrude.
Keywords: nursing, nursing management, management, healthcare management, healthcare communication, nursing leadership, healthcare leadership, leadership, health policy, hospital, sociology, qualitative rsearch, Turkiye
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences