No Cover Image

Journal article 527 views

Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury / Rodger Ll Wood; Claire Williams; Ruth Lewis

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Volume: 16, Issue: 06, Pages: 1108 - 1114

Swansea University Author: Williams, Claire

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

Abstract

<p>A high frequency of suicide ideation (SI) has been reported following traumatic brain injury (TBI) (Simpson & Tate, 2002; Teasdale & Engberg, 2001). This study examined the frequency of SI following TBI, and its relationship to alexithymia, and depression, plus two compone...

Full description

Published in: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
ISSN: 1355-6177 1469-7661
Published: Cambridge Journals 2010
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6741
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: <p>A high frequency of suicide ideation (SI) has been reported following traumatic brain injury (TBI) (Simpson & Tate, 2002; Teasdale & Engberg, 2001). This study examined the frequency of SI following TBI, and its relationship to alexithymia, and depression, plus two components of depression—hopelessness and worthlessness. One hundred and five TBI patients and 74 demographically matched controls completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Ratings of SI, hopelessness, and worthlessness were extracted from the BDI-II. Results confirm a high frequency of SI (33%) and alexithymia (61%) after TBI compared with healthy controls (1.4% and 6.5%, respectively). A high frequency of alexithymia was also found in a sub-group of moderate-severely depressed TBI patients (70.68%) compared with two non-TBI depressed samples (53.92% and 44.8%). A significant association was found between SI and alexithymia in the TBI group, with the SI group reporting significantly higher TAS-20 total scores. However, logistic regression analysis found that worthlessness was the strongest predictor of SI after TBI. The results of this study suggest that increased attention should be directed toward emotional change after TBI, as alexithymia may mediate the development of worthlessness and, in turn, increase the risk of SI.</p>
Keywords: Brain Injuries; Emotions; Affective Symptoms; Depression; Hopelessness; Worthlessness
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 06
Start Page: 1108
End Page: 1114