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Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury

Rodger Wood, Claire Williams Orcid Logo, Ruth Lewis

Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Volume: 16, Issue: 06, Pages: 1108 - 1114

Swansea University Authors: Rodger Wood, Claire Williams Orcid Logo

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Abstract

<p>A high frequency of suicide ideation (SI) has been reported following traumatic brain injury (TBI) (Simpson & Tate, 2002; Teasdale & Engberg, 2001). This study examined the frequency of SI following TBI, and its relationship to alexithymia, and depression, plus two compone...

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Published in: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
ISSN: 1355-6177 1469-7661
Published: Cambridge Journals 2010
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6741
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spelling 2013-12-09T16:37:54.0480117 v2 6741 2012-01-23 Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury 7d67e475699a3b3ab820b4a5d2602dc9 Rodger Wood Rodger Wood true false 21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d 0000-0002-0791-744X Claire Williams Claire Williams true false 2012-01-23 SGMED &#60;p&#62;A high frequency of suicide ideation (SI) has been reported following traumatic brain injury (TBI) (Simpson & Tate, 2002; Teasdale & Engberg, 2001). This study examined the frequency of SI following TBI, and its relationship to alexithymia, and depression, plus two components of depression—hopelessness and worthlessness. One hundred and five TBI patients and 74 demographically matched controls completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Ratings of SI, hopelessness, and worthlessness were extracted from the BDI-II. Results confirm a high frequency of SI (33%) and alexithymia (61%) after TBI compared with healthy controls (1.4% and 6.5%, respectively). A high frequency of alexithymia was also found in a sub-group of moderate-severely depressed TBI patients (70.68%) compared with two non-TBI depressed samples (53.92% and 44.8%). A significant association was found between SI and alexithymia in the TBI group, with the SI group reporting significantly higher TAS-20 total scores. However, logistic regression analysis found that worthlessness was the strongest predictor of SI after TBI. The results of this study suggest that increased attention should be directed toward emotional change after TBI, as alexithymia may mediate the development of worthlessness and, in turn, increase the risk of SI.&#60;/p&#62; Journal Article Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 16 06 1108 1114 Cambridge Journals 1355-6177 1469-7661 Brain Injuries; Emotions; Affective Symptoms; Depression; Hopelessness; Worthlessness 28 9 2010 2010-09-28 10.1017/S1355617710001013 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract;jsessionid=5B12BFD2DC00F907420F906318CB14D8.journals?fromPage=online&amp;aid=7925887 COLLEGE NANME Medical School - School COLLEGE CODE SGMED Swansea University 2013-12-09T16:37:54.0480117 2012-01-23T15:24:46.7970000 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Psychology Rodger Wood 1 Claire Williams 0000-0002-0791-744X 2 Ruth Lewis 3
title Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury
spellingShingle Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury
Rodger Wood
Claire Williams
title_short Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury
title_full Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury
title_fullStr Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury
title_full_unstemmed Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury
title_sort Role of alexithymia in suicide ideation after traumatic brain injury
author_id_str_mv 7d67e475699a3b3ab820b4a5d2602dc9
21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d
author_id_fullname_str_mv 7d67e475699a3b3ab820b4a5d2602dc9_***_Rodger Wood
21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d_***_Claire Williams
author Rodger Wood
Claire Williams
author2 Rodger Wood
Claire Williams
Ruth Lewis
format Journal article
container_title Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society
container_volume 16
container_issue 06
container_start_page 1108
publishDate 2010
institution Swansea University
issn 1355-6177
1469-7661
doi_str_mv 10.1017/S1355617710001013
publisher Cambridge Journals
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Psychology{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Psychology
url http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract;jsessionid=5B12BFD2DC00F907420F906318CB14D8.journals?fromPage=online&amp;aid=7925887
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description &#60;p&#62;A high frequency of suicide ideation (SI) has been reported following traumatic brain injury (TBI) (Simpson & Tate, 2002; Teasdale & Engberg, 2001). This study examined the frequency of SI following TBI, and its relationship to alexithymia, and depression, plus two components of depression—hopelessness and worthlessness. One hundred and five TBI patients and 74 demographically matched controls completed the Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 (TAS-20) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Ratings of SI, hopelessness, and worthlessness were extracted from the BDI-II. Results confirm a high frequency of SI (33%) and alexithymia (61%) after TBI compared with healthy controls (1.4% and 6.5%, respectively). A high frequency of alexithymia was also found in a sub-group of moderate-severely depressed TBI patients (70.68%) compared with two non-TBI depressed samples (53.92% and 44.8%). A significant association was found between SI and alexithymia in the TBI group, with the SI group reporting significantly higher TAS-20 total scores. However, logistic regression analysis found that worthlessness was the strongest predictor of SI after TBI. The results of this study suggest that increased attention should be directed toward emotional change after TBI, as alexithymia may mediate the development of worthlessness and, in turn, increase the risk of SI.&#60;/p&#62;
published_date 2010-09-28T03:07:53Z
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