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Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention

Christoph Weidemann, David E Huber, Richard M Shiffrin

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Volume: 31, Issue: 1, Pages: 40 - 61

Swansea University Author: Christoph Weidemann

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Abstract

The authors investigated spatial, temporal, and attentional manipulations in a short-term repetition priming paradigm. Brief primes produced a strong preference to choose the primed alternative, whereas long primes had the opposite effect. However, a 2nd brief presentation of a long prime produced a...

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Published in: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
ISSN: 0096-1523
Published: 2005
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6927
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spelling 2019-06-12T14:46:55.0524657 v2 6927 2012-01-28 Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c Christoph Weidemann Christoph Weidemann true false 2012-01-28 FGMHL The authors investigated spatial, temporal, and attentional manipulations in a short-term repetition priming paradigm. Brief primes produced a strong preference to choose the primed alternative, whereas long primes had the opposite effect. However, a 2nd brief presentation of a long prime produced a preference for the primed word despite the long total prime duration. These surprising results are explained by a computational model that posits the offsetting components of source confusion (prime features are confused with target features) and discounting (evidence from primed features is discounted). The authors obtained compelling evidence for these components by showing how they can cooperate or compete through different manipulations of prime salience. The model allows for dissociations between prime salience and the magnitude of priming, thereby providing a unified account of "subliminal" and "supraliminal" priming. Journal Article Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 31 1 40 61 0096-1523 28 2 2005 2005-02-28 10.1037/0096-1523.31.1.40 http://cogsci.info/papers/WeidemannEtAl2005.pdf COLLEGE NANME Medicine, Health and Life Science - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGMHL Swansea University 2019-06-12T14:46:55.0524657 2012-01-28T20:18:55.6030000 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Christoph Weidemann 1 David E Huber 2 Richard M Shiffrin 3
title Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention
spellingShingle Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention
Christoph Weidemann
title_short Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention
title_full Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention
title_fullStr Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention
title_full_unstemmed Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention
title_sort Confusion and Compensation in Visual Perception: Effects of Spatiotemporal Proximity and Selective Attention
author_id_str_mv b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c
author_id_fullname_str_mv b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c_***_Christoph Weidemann
author Christoph Weidemann
author2 Christoph Weidemann
David E Huber
Richard M Shiffrin
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
container_volume 31
container_issue 1
container_start_page 40
publishDate 2005
institution Swansea University
issn 0096-1523
doi_str_mv 10.1037/0096-1523.31.1.40
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
url http://cogsci.info/papers/WeidemannEtAl2005.pdf
document_store_str 0
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description The authors investigated spatial, temporal, and attentional manipulations in a short-term repetition priming paradigm. Brief primes produced a strong preference to choose the primed alternative, whereas long primes had the opposite effect. However, a 2nd brief presentation of a long prime produced a preference for the primed word despite the long total prime duration. These surprising results are explained by a computational model that posits the offsetting components of source confusion (prime features are confused with target features) and discounting (evidence from primed features is discounted). The authors obtained compelling evidence for these components by showing how they can cooperate or compete through different manipulations of prime salience. The model allows for dissociations between prime salience and the magnitude of priming, thereby providing a unified account of "subliminal" and "supraliminal" priming.
published_date 2005-02-28T03:17:07Z
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