No Cover Image

Journal article 681 views

Real nursing? The development of telenursing / Helen A Snooks, Anne M Williams, Lesley J Griffiths, Julie Peconi, Jaynie Rance, Sharon Snelgrove, Srikant Sarangi, Paul Wainwright, Wai-Yee Cheung

Journal of Advanced Nursing, Volume: 61, Issue: 6, Pages: 631 - 640

Swansea University Author: Jaynie Rance

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

Abstract

<p>Title. Real nursing? The development of telenursing Aim. This paper is a report of a study to understand the impact of telenursing from the perspective of nurses involved in its provision, and in more traditional roles. Background. Nurse-led telephone helplines have recently been introduced...

Full description

Published in: Journal of Advanced Nursing
ISSN: 0309-2402 1365-2648
Published: Blackwell Publishing 2008
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6955
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2013-07-23T11:56:55Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T04:34:38Z
id cronfa6955
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2015-05-11T09:35:41.6887305</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>6955</id><entry>2012-01-30</entry><title>Real nursing? The development of telenursing</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>14360f4993b452995fbc22db857cabf7</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-9504-0675</ORCID><firstname>Jaynie</firstname><surname>Rance</surname><name>Jaynie Rance</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2012-01-30</date><deptcode>PHAC</deptcode><abstract>&lt;p&gt;Title. Real nursing? The development of telenursing Aim. This paper is a report of a study to understand the impact of telenursing from the perspective of nurses involved in its provision, and in more traditional roles. Background. Nurse-led telephone helplines have recently been introduced across the United Kingdom, a major step in the development of nursing practice. Method. A structured questionnaire was sent to all nurses working in the NHS Direct (National Health Service Direct) Wales telephone service (n = 111). Ninetytwo completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 83 per cent). Two focus groups were conducted: one with telephone service nurses (n = 8) and one with other nurses (n = 5). The data were collected in 2002. Findings. Respondents represented a highly educated workforce from a range of healthcare specialties. They reported that they joined the telephone service for improved salary and flexible working. Two-thirds reported improved job satisfaction. All focus group participants reported that the development of nursing skills was affected by the use of decision support software and the remote nature of the consultation. Participants reported opportunities for skill development, although the role could be stressful. All agreed that the service was popular with callers, but the nurses from outside raised concerns about whether telenursing was &#x2018;real&#x2019; nursing and about the evidence base for the service and access by disadvantaged groups. Conclusion. Differences between the groups reflect policy tensions between the need to develop new nursing skills, including the use of technology, to improve efficiency and recognition of the worth of hands-on nursing. These tensions must be addressed for the telephone service to function as part of an integrated healthcare system.&lt;/p&gt;</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Advanced Nursing</journal><volume>61</volume><journalNumber>6</journalNumber><paginationStart>631</paginationStart><paginationEnd>640</paginationEnd><publisher>Blackwell Publishing</publisher><issnPrint>0309-2402</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1365-2648</issnElectronic><keywords>focus groups, nurse roles, policy, questionnaires, telenursing, technology</keywords><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>3</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2008</publishedYear><publishedDate>2008-03-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04546.x</doi><url>http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04546.x/abstract</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Public Health</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>PHAC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2015-05-11T09:35:41.6887305</lastEdited><Created>2012-01-30T08:20:57.1070000</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Public Health and Policy Studies</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Helen A</firstname><surname>Snooks</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Anne M</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Lesley J</firstname><surname>Griffiths</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Julie</firstname><surname>Peconi</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Jaynie</firstname><surname>Rance</surname><orcid>0000-0002-9504-0675</orcid><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Sharon</firstname><surname>Snelgrove</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Srikant</firstname><surname>Sarangi</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Paul</firstname><surname>Wainwright</surname><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Wai-Yee</firstname><surname>Cheung</surname><order>9</order></author></authors><documents/><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2015-05-11T09:35:41.6887305 v2 6955 2012-01-30 Real nursing? The development of telenursing 14360f4993b452995fbc22db857cabf7 0000-0002-9504-0675 Jaynie Rance Jaynie Rance true false 2012-01-30 PHAC <p>Title. Real nursing? The development of telenursing Aim. This paper is a report of a study to understand the impact of telenursing from the perspective of nurses involved in its provision, and in more traditional roles. Background. Nurse-led telephone helplines have recently been introduced across the United Kingdom, a major step in the development of nursing practice. Method. A structured questionnaire was sent to all nurses working in the NHS Direct (National Health Service Direct) Wales telephone service (n = 111). Ninetytwo completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 83 per cent). Two focus groups were conducted: one with telephone service nurses (n = 8) and one with other nurses (n = 5). The data were collected in 2002. Findings. Respondents represented a highly educated workforce from a range of healthcare specialties. They reported that they joined the telephone service for improved salary and flexible working. Two-thirds reported improved job satisfaction. All focus group participants reported that the development of nursing skills was affected by the use of decision support software and the remote nature of the consultation. Participants reported opportunities for skill development, although the role could be stressful. All agreed that the service was popular with callers, but the nurses from outside raised concerns about whether telenursing was ‘real’ nursing and about the evidence base for the service and access by disadvantaged groups. Conclusion. Differences between the groups reflect policy tensions between the need to develop new nursing skills, including the use of technology, to improve efficiency and recognition of the worth of hands-on nursing. These tensions must be addressed for the telephone service to function as part of an integrated healthcare system.</p> Journal Article Journal of Advanced Nursing 61 6 631 640 Blackwell Publishing 0309-2402 1365-2648 focus groups, nurse roles, policy, questionnaires, telenursing, technology 31 3 2008 2008-03-31 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04546.x http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04546.x/abstract COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University 2015-05-11T09:35:41.6887305 2012-01-30T08:20:57.1070000 College of Human and Health Sciences Public Health and Policy Studies Helen A Snooks 1 Anne M Williams 2 Lesley J Griffiths 3 Julie Peconi 4 Jaynie Rance 0000-0002-9504-0675 5 Sharon Snelgrove 6 Srikant Sarangi 7 Paul Wainwright 8 Wai-Yee Cheung 9
title Real nursing? The development of telenursing
spellingShingle Real nursing? The development of telenursing
Jaynie, Rance
title_short Real nursing? The development of telenursing
title_full Real nursing? The development of telenursing
title_fullStr Real nursing? The development of telenursing
title_full_unstemmed Real nursing? The development of telenursing
title_sort Real nursing? The development of telenursing
author_id_str_mv 14360f4993b452995fbc22db857cabf7
author_id_fullname_str_mv 14360f4993b452995fbc22db857cabf7_***_Jaynie, Rance
author Jaynie, Rance
author2 Helen A Snooks
Anne M Williams
Lesley J Griffiths
Julie Peconi
Jaynie Rance
Sharon Snelgrove
Srikant Sarangi
Paul Wainwright
Wai-Yee Cheung
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Advanced Nursing
container_volume 61
container_issue 6
container_start_page 631
publishDate 2008
institution Swansea University
issn 0309-2402
1365-2648
doi_str_mv 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04546.x
publisher Blackwell Publishing
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Public Health and Policy Studies{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Public Health and Policy Studies
url http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04546.x/abstract
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description <p>Title. Real nursing? The development of telenursing Aim. This paper is a report of a study to understand the impact of telenursing from the perspective of nurses involved in its provision, and in more traditional roles. Background. Nurse-led telephone helplines have recently been introduced across the United Kingdom, a major step in the development of nursing practice. Method. A structured questionnaire was sent to all nurses working in the NHS Direct (National Health Service Direct) Wales telephone service (n = 111). Ninetytwo completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 83 per cent). Two focus groups were conducted: one with telephone service nurses (n = 8) and one with other nurses (n = 5). The data were collected in 2002. Findings. Respondents represented a highly educated workforce from a range of healthcare specialties. They reported that they joined the telephone service for improved salary and flexible working. Two-thirds reported improved job satisfaction. All focus group participants reported that the development of nursing skills was affected by the use of decision support software and the remote nature of the consultation. Participants reported opportunities for skill development, although the role could be stressful. All agreed that the service was popular with callers, but the nurses from outside raised concerns about whether telenursing was ‘real’ nursing and about the evidence base for the service and access by disadvantaged groups. Conclusion. Differences between the groups reflect policy tensions between the need to develop new nursing skills, including the use of technology, to improve efficiency and recognition of the worth of hands-on nursing. These tensions must be addressed for the telephone service to function as part of an integrated healthcare system.</p>
published_date 2008-03-31T03:18:19Z
_version_ 1711475994430275584
score 10.822359