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Journal article 1052 views

Recall termination in free recall

Jonathan F Miller, Christoph Weidemann, Michael J Kahana

Memory & Cognition, Volume: 40, Issue: 4, Pages: 540 - 550

Swansea University Author: Christoph Weidemann

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Abstract

Although much is known about the dynamics of memory search in the free recall task, relatively little is known about the factors related to recall termination. Reanalyzing individual trial data from 14 prior studies (1,079 participants in 28,015 trials) and defining termination as occurring when a f...

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Published in: Memory & Cognition
ISSN: 0090-502X 1532-5946
Published: 2012
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa7908
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spelling 2019-06-12T15:39:45.7390905 v2 7908 2012-02-20 Recall termination in free recall b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c Christoph Weidemann Christoph Weidemann true false 2012-02-20 FGMHL Although much is known about the dynamics of memory search in the free recall task, relatively little is known about the factors related to recall termination. Reanalyzing individual trial data from 14 prior studies (1,079 participants in 28,015 trials) and defining termination as occurring when a final response is followed by a long nonresponse interval, we observed that termination probability increased throughout the recall period and that retrieval was more likely to terminate following an error than following a correct response. Among errors, termination probability was higher following prior-list intrusions and repetitions than following extralist intrusions. To verify that this pattern of results can be seen in a single study, we report a new experiment in which 80 participants contributed recall data from a total of 9,122 trials. This experiment replicated the pattern observed in the aggregate analysis of the prior studies. Journal Article Memory & Cognition 40 4 540 550 0090-502X 1532-5946 31 12 2012 2012-12-31 10.3758/s13421-011-0178-9 http://cogsci.info/papers/MillerEtAl2012.pdf COLLEGE NANME Medicine, Health and Life Science - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGMHL Swansea University 2019-06-12T15:39:45.7390905 2012-02-20T23:57:58.3900000 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Psychology Jonathan F Miller 1 Christoph Weidemann 2 Michael J Kahana 3
title Recall termination in free recall
spellingShingle Recall termination in free recall
Christoph Weidemann
title_short Recall termination in free recall
title_full Recall termination in free recall
title_fullStr Recall termination in free recall
title_full_unstemmed Recall termination in free recall
title_sort Recall termination in free recall
author_id_str_mv b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c
author_id_fullname_str_mv b155eeefe08155214e70fea25649223c_***_Christoph Weidemann
author Christoph Weidemann
author2 Jonathan F Miller
Christoph Weidemann
Michael J Kahana
format Journal article
container_title Memory & Cognition
container_volume 40
container_issue 4
container_start_page 540
publishDate 2012
institution Swansea University
issn 0090-502X
1532-5946
doi_str_mv 10.3758/s13421-011-0178-9
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Psychology{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Psychology
url http://cogsci.info/papers/MillerEtAl2012.pdf
document_store_str 0
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description Although much is known about the dynamics of memory search in the free recall task, relatively little is known about the factors related to recall termination. Reanalyzing individual trial data from 14 prior studies (1,079 participants in 28,015 trials) and defining termination as occurring when a final response is followed by a long nonresponse interval, we observed that termination probability increased throughout the recall period and that retrieval was more likely to terminate following an error than following a correct response. Among errors, termination probability was higher following prior-list intrusions and repetitions than following extralist intrusions. To verify that this pattern of results can be seen in a single study, we report a new experiment in which 80 participants contributed recall data from a total of 9,122 trials. This experiment replicated the pattern observed in the aggregate analysis of the prior studies.
published_date 2012-12-31T03:09:55Z
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