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MDMA and methamphetamine: some paradoxical negative and positive mood changes in an acute dose laboratory study / Andrew Parrott; Amy Gibbs; Andrew B Scholey; Rebecca King; Katherine Owens; Phil Swann; Ed Ogden; Con Stough

Psychopharmacology, Volume: 215, Issue: 3, Pages: 527 - 536

Swansea University Author: Andrew, Parrott

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Abstract

Rationale: to investigate the acute mood effects of oral Ecstasy/MDMA, methamphetamine, and placebo, in a double-blind laboratory study. Methods: 53 healthy participants comprised abstinent recreational users of stimulant drugs, both female and male, with a mean age around 25 years. The three test s...

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Published in: Psychopharmacology
ISSN: 0033-3158 1432-2072
Published: 2011
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa9310
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Abstract: Rationale: to investigate the acute mood effects of oral Ecstasy/MDMA, methamphetamine, and placebo, in a double-blind laboratory study. Methods: 53 healthy participants comprised abstinent recreational users of stimulant drugs, both female and male, with a mean age around 25 years. The three test sessions involved acute 100mg oral 3.4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 0.42mg/kg oral methamphetamine, and matching placebo. Drug administration was counterbalanced, testing was double-blind, and medical supervision was present throughout. Car driving performance on a laboratory simulator was assessed after 3 and 24 hours, with the findings being presented elsewhere. Positive and negative moods (PANAS self-ratings) were completed before drug administration, 3 hours, 4.5 hours, and 24 hours later. Blood samples were taken to monitor drug plasma levels.Results: Following MDMA there were no significant increases in positive moods, whereas negative moods were significantly higher than under placebo. Methamphetamine led to significant increases in both positive moods and negative moods. The MDMA findings contrast with the elated moods typically noted by dance clubbers on Ecstasy. However they are consistent with previous laboratory findings, where an array of positive and negative mood changes have been demonstrated. One possible explanatory factor was the neutral environmental situation, particularly if a primary action of MDMA is to intensify ongoing psychological states. Other explanatory factors, such as dosage, post-drug timing, neurohormonal influences, and social factors, are also discussed. Conclusions: In the laboratory acute methamphetamine led to significantly higher positive moods. However against expectations, MDMA did not generate a significant increase in positive moods.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 3
Start Page: 527
End Page: 536