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A normative study of acronyms and acronym naming

C Izura, D Playfoot, Cristina Izura Orcid Logo, David Playfoot Orcid Logo

Behavior Research Methods

Swansea University Authors: Cristina Izura Orcid Logo, David Playfoot Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3758/s13428-011-0175-8

Abstract

Acronyms are an idiosyncratic part of our everydayvocabulary. Research in word processing has used acronymsas a tool to answer fundamental questions such as thenature of the word superiority effect (WSE) or which is thebest way to account for word-reading processes. In thisstudy, acronym naming was...

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Published in: Behavior Research Methods
Published: 2012
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa10049
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Abstract: Acronyms are an idiosyncratic part of our everydayvocabulary. Research in word processing has used acronymsas a tool to answer fundamental questions such as thenature of the word superiority effect (WSE) or which is thebest way to account for word-reading processes. In thisstudy, acronym naming was assessed by looking at theinfluence that a number of variables known to affect mainstreamword processing has had in acronym naming. Thenature of the effect of these factors on acronym naming wasexamined using a multilevel regression analysis. First, 146acronyms were described in terms of their age of acquisition,bigram and trigram frequencies, imageability, numberof orthographic neighbors, frequency, orthographic and phonologicallength, print-to-pronunciation patterns, and voicingcharacteristics. Naming times were influenced by lexical andsublexical factors, indicating that acronym naming is a complexprocess affected by more variables than those previouslyconsidered.
Keywords: Acronyms . Norms . Age of acquisition .
College: College of Human and Health Sciences