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Oxysterols in the brain of the cholesterol 24-hydroxylase knockout mouse / William, Griffiths; Yuqin, Wang

Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

Swansesa University Authors: William, Griffiths, Yuqin, Wang

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DOI (Published version): 10.1016/j.bbrc.2014.01.153

Abstract

Oxysterols are oxidised forms of cholesterol or its precursors. In this study we utilised the cholesterol 24-hydroxylase knockout mouse (Cyp46a1-/-) to study the sterol and oxysterol content of brain. Despite a great reduction in the abundance of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, the dominant metabolite of ch...

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Published in: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Published: 2014
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa17817
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Abstract: Oxysterols are oxidised forms of cholesterol or its precursors. In this study we utilised the cholesterol 24-hydroxylase knockout mouse (Cyp46a1-/-) to study the sterol and oxysterol content of brain. Despite a great reduction in the abundance of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, the dominant metabolite of cholesterol in wild type brain, no other cholesterol metabolite was found to quantitatively replace this oxysterol in the Cyp46a1-/- mouse. Only minor amounts of other side-chain oxysterols including 22R-, 24R-, 25- and (25R),26-hydroxycholesterols were detected. In line with earlier studies, levels of cholesterol were similar in Cyp46a1-/- and wild type animals. However, the level of the cholesterol precursor, desomsterol, and its parallel metabolite formed via a shut of the mevalonate pathway, 24S,25-epoxycholesterol, were reduced in the Cyp46a1-/- mouse. The reduction in abundance of 24S,25-epoxycholesterol is interesting in light of a recent report indicating that this oxysterol promotes dopaminergic neurogenesis
College: Swansea University Medical School