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A randomised trial of pre-exercise meal composition on performance and muscle damage in well-trained basketball players / Hannah Gentle; Thomas Love; Anna Howe; Katherine Black; Tom Love

Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, Volume: 11, Issue: 1, Start page: 33

Swansea University Author: Tom, Love

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    © 2014 Gentle et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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Abstract

BackgroundAttenuating muscle damage is important to subsequent sports performance. It is possible that pre-exercise protein intake could influence markers of muscle damage and benefit performance, however, published research provides conflicting results. At present no study has investigated protein...

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Published in: Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
ISSN: 1550-2783
Published: 2014
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20613
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Abstract: BackgroundAttenuating muscle damage is important to subsequent sports performance. It is possible that pre-exercise protein intake could influence markers of muscle damage and benefit performance, however, published research provides conflicting results. At present no study has investigated protein and carbohydrate (PRO/CHO) co-ingestion solely pre-exercise, nor prior to basketball-specific exercise.The purpose of this study was to answer the research question; would pre-exercise protein intake enhance performance or attenuate muscle damage during a basketball simulation test?MethodsTen well-trained male basketball players consumed either carbohydrate (1 g · kg−1 body mass) with protein (1 g · kg−1 body mass), or carbohydrate alone (2 g · kg−1 body mass) in a randomised cross- over design, 90 minutes before completing an 87-minute exercise protocol.ResultsThe rise in creatine kinase (CK) from baseline to post-exercise was attenuated following PRO/CHO (56 ± 13U · L−1) compared to carbohydrate (100 ± 10 U · L−1), (p = 0.018). Blood glucose was also higher during and post-exercise following PRO/CHO (p < 0.050), as was free throw shooting accuracy in the fourth quarter (p = 0.027). Nausea during (p = 0.007) and post-(p = 0.039) exercise increased following PRO/CHO, as did cortisol post-exercise (p = 0.038).ConclusionsResults suggest that in well-trained basketball players, pre-exercise PRO/CHO may attenuate the rise in CK, indicative of a decrease in muscle damage during exercise. However, unfamiliarity with the protein amount provided may have increased nausea during exercise, and this may have limited the ability to see an improvement in more performance measures.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 1
Start Page: 33