No Cover Image

Conference contribution 119 views

A computational method of obtaining reliable measurement of periosteal cross-sectional area of human radii from laser scans / Nicholas Owen; Pooya Mahmoodi; Annan Simon

Proceedings of the 23rd UK Conference of the Association for Computational Mechanics in Engineering, Volume: 23, Pages: 73 - 76

Swansea University Author: Owen, Nicholas

Abstract

ABSTRACTThe accurate quantification of bones cross-sectional geometry provides valuable information about mechanical properties of bones such as rigidity to torsional, bending and compressive loading and also reveals insights into habitual activities of humans in the past. However, the use of curren...

Full description

Published in: Proceedings of the 23rd UK Conference of the Association for Computational Mechanics in Engineering
ISBN: ISBN 978-0-9567462-4-5
Published: Swansea 2015
Online Access: http://eng-intranet-web.swan.ac.uk/acme2015/ACMEUK2015.pdf
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa20806
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: ABSTRACTThe accurate quantification of bones cross-sectional geometry provides valuable information about mechanical properties of bones such as rigidity to torsional, bending and compressive loading and also reveals insights into habitual activities of humans in the past. However, the use of current methods can produce large errors between measured and true cross-sectional areas. In this study the minimum cross sectional area was calculated at mid-shaft for a unique collection of laser scanned radii bones, recovered from Mary Rose warship, using a novel technique. A computational method was used to measure multiple cross-sectional areas for different orientations to then determine a minimum. This was then taken to represent a reliable mid-shaft cross-sectional area. The reliability of the process was tested using Bland and Altman plots to analyse the agreement between measurement trials. The systematic bias between the two measurement trials was 0.06mm2 (0.04% of the average cross-sectional area measurement) with 95% limits of agreement of 1.69mm2 (1.13%) and -1.57mm2 (1.05%). Consequently this method can be used as a reliable measure of periosteal cross-sectional area. The possibility also exists to transfer the methods described here to other imaging technologies for example, micro CT and magnetic resonance imaging. This would augment existing methods of computational analysis and produce accurate models.Keywords: computational modelling, bone topology, osteology, biomechanics
Keywords: computational modelling, bone topology, osteology, biomechanics
College: College of Engineering
Start Page: 73
End Page: 76