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A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics

Christopher Phillips Orcid Logo, David Beynon Orcid Logo, Simon Hamblyn, Glyn Davies, David Gethin, Tim Claypole Orcid Logo

Coatings, Volume: 4, Issue: 2, Pages: 356 - 379

Swansea University Authors: Christopher Phillips Orcid Logo, David Beynon Orcid Logo, Tim Claypole Orcid Logo

Abstract

This article presents a novel method for accelerated wear of squeegees used in screen printing and describes the development of mechanical tests which allow more in-depth measurement of squeegee properties. In this study, squeegees were abraded on the screen press so that they could be used for subs...

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Published in: Coatings
ISSN: 2079-6412
Published: 2014
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa22362
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In this study, squeegees were abraded on the screen press so that they could be used for subsequent print tests to evaluate the effect of wear on the printed product. Squeegee wear was found to vary between different squeegee types and caused increases in ink transfer and wider printed features. In production this will lead to greater ink consumption, cost per unit and a likelihood of product failure. This also has consequences for the production of functional layers, etc., used in the construction of printed electronics. While more wear generally gave greater increases in ink deposition, the effect of wear differed, depending on the squeegee. There was a correlation between the angle of the squeegee wear and ink film thickness from a worn squeegee. An ability to resist flexing gave a high wear angle and presented a sharper edge at the squeegee/screen interface thus mitigating the effect of wear. There was also a good correlation between resistance to flexing and ink film thickness for unworn squeegees, which was more effective than a comparison based on Shore A hardness. Squeegee indentation at different force levels gave more information than a standard Shore A hardness test and the apparatus used was able to reliably measure reductions in surface hardness due to solvent absorption. Increases in ink deposition gave lower resistance in printed silver lines; however, the correlation between the amount of ink deposited and the resistance, remained the same for all levels of wear, suggesting that the wear regime designed for this study did not induce detrimental print defects such as line breakages.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Coatings</journal><volume>4</volume><journalNumber>2</journalNumber><paginationStart>356</paginationStart><paginationEnd>379</paginationEnd><publisher/><issnElectronic>2079-6412</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>12</publishedDay><publishedMonth>6</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2014</publishedYear><publishedDate>2014-06-12</publishedDate><doi>10.3390/coatings4020356</doi><url/><notes>This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.</notes><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Chemical Engineering</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>CHEG</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2017-07-11T11:28:48.3064833</lastEdited><Created>2015-07-16T13:22:28.1336608</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Christopher</firstname><surname>Phillips</surname><orcid>0000-0001-8011-710X</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>David</firstname><surname>Beynon</surname><orcid>0000-0002-8189-9489</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Simon</firstname><surname>Hamblyn</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Glyn</firstname><surname>Davies</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>David</firstname><surname>Gethin</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Tim</firstname><surname>Claypole</surname><orcid>0000-0003-1393-9634</orcid><order>6</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0022362-15072016123923.pdf</filename><originalFilename>Phillips2014-2.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2016-07-15T12:39:23.4030000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>2065797</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2016-07-15T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>false</copyrightCorrect></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2017-07-11T11:28:48.3064833 v2 22362 2015-07-16 A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics cc734f776f10b3fb9b43816c9f617bb5 0000-0001-8011-710X Christopher Phillips Christopher Phillips true false f5cf40043658d0b8a747ef6224019939 0000-0002-8189-9489 David Beynon David Beynon true false 7735385522f1e68a8775b4f709e91d55 0000-0003-1393-9634 Tim Claypole Tim Claypole true false 2015-07-16 CHEG This article presents a novel method for accelerated wear of squeegees used in screen printing and describes the development of mechanical tests which allow more in-depth measurement of squeegee properties. In this study, squeegees were abraded on the screen press so that they could be used for subsequent print tests to evaluate the effect of wear on the printed product. Squeegee wear was found to vary between different squeegee types and caused increases in ink transfer and wider printed features. In production this will lead to greater ink consumption, cost per unit and a likelihood of product failure. This also has consequences for the production of functional layers, etc., used in the construction of printed electronics. While more wear generally gave greater increases in ink deposition, the effect of wear differed, depending on the squeegee. There was a correlation between the angle of the squeegee wear and ink film thickness from a worn squeegee. An ability to resist flexing gave a high wear angle and presented a sharper edge at the squeegee/screen interface thus mitigating the effect of wear. There was also a good correlation between resistance to flexing and ink film thickness for unworn squeegees, which was more effective than a comparison based on Shore A hardness. Squeegee indentation at different force levels gave more information than a standard Shore A hardness test and the apparatus used was able to reliably measure reductions in surface hardness due to solvent absorption. Increases in ink deposition gave lower resistance in printed silver lines; however, the correlation between the amount of ink deposited and the resistance, remained the same for all levels of wear, suggesting that the wear regime designed for this study did not induce detrimental print defects such as line breakages. Journal Article Coatings 4 2 356 379 2079-6412 12 6 2014 2014-06-12 10.3390/coatings4020356 This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. COLLEGE NANME Chemical Engineering COLLEGE CODE CHEG Swansea University 2017-07-11T11:28:48.3064833 2015-07-16T13:22:28.1336608 College of Engineering Engineering Christopher Phillips 0000-0001-8011-710X 1 David Beynon 0000-0002-8189-9489 2 Simon Hamblyn 3 Glyn Davies 4 David Gethin 5 Tim Claypole 0000-0003-1393-9634 6 0022362-15072016123923.pdf Phillips2014-2.pdf 2016-07-15T12:39:23.4030000 Output 2065797 application/pdf Version of Record true 2016-07-15T00:00:00.0000000 false
title A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics
spellingShingle A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics
Christopher Phillips
David Beynon
Tim Claypole
title_short A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics
title_full A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics
title_fullStr A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics
title_full_unstemmed A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics
title_sort A Study of the Abrasion of Squeegees Used in Screen Printing and Its Effect on Performance with Application in Printed Electronics
author_id_str_mv cc734f776f10b3fb9b43816c9f617bb5
f5cf40043658d0b8a747ef6224019939
7735385522f1e68a8775b4f709e91d55
author_id_fullname_str_mv cc734f776f10b3fb9b43816c9f617bb5_***_Christopher Phillips
f5cf40043658d0b8a747ef6224019939_***_David Beynon
7735385522f1e68a8775b4f709e91d55_***_Tim Claypole
author Christopher Phillips
David Beynon
Tim Claypole
author2 Christopher Phillips
David Beynon
Simon Hamblyn
Glyn Davies
David Gethin
Tim Claypole
format Journal article
container_title Coatings
container_volume 4
container_issue 2
container_start_page 356
publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
issn 2079-6412
doi_str_mv 10.3390/coatings4020356
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description This article presents a novel method for accelerated wear of squeegees used in screen printing and describes the development of mechanical tests which allow more in-depth measurement of squeegee properties. In this study, squeegees were abraded on the screen press so that they could be used for subsequent print tests to evaluate the effect of wear on the printed product. Squeegee wear was found to vary between different squeegee types and caused increases in ink transfer and wider printed features. In production this will lead to greater ink consumption, cost per unit and a likelihood of product failure. This also has consequences for the production of functional layers, etc., used in the construction of printed electronics. While more wear generally gave greater increases in ink deposition, the effect of wear differed, depending on the squeegee. There was a correlation between the angle of the squeegee wear and ink film thickness from a worn squeegee. An ability to resist flexing gave a high wear angle and presented a sharper edge at the squeegee/screen interface thus mitigating the effect of wear. There was also a good correlation between resistance to flexing and ink film thickness for unworn squeegees, which was more effective than a comparison based on Shore A hardness. Squeegee indentation at different force levels gave more information than a standard Shore A hardness test and the apparatus used was able to reliably measure reductions in surface hardness due to solvent absorption. Increases in ink deposition gave lower resistance in printed silver lines; however, the correlation between the amount of ink deposited and the resistance, remained the same for all levels of wear, suggesting that the wear regime designed for this study did not induce detrimental print defects such as line breakages.
published_date 2014-06-12T03:40:34Z
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