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Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment

Richard Owen Orcid Logo

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, Volume: 1, Issue: 2, Pages: 46 - 55

Swansea University Author: Richard Owen Orcid Logo

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Abstract

This article looks at an attempt to enhance students’ critical thinking, professional and personal skills through an innovation in the use of peer assessment on an undergraduate law degree programme. This involved peer assessing asynchronously materials previously submitted. It was also to a limited...

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Published in: Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education
ISSN: 2050-7003
Published: 2009
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34055
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first_indexed 2017-07-06T05:14:29Z
last_indexed 2018-02-09T05:23:49Z
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spelling 2017-07-13T11:17:17.0804601 v2 34055 2017-05-31 Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment e06eaff1456f64c45cc72a85498dabf0 0000-0003-0125-4697 Richard Owen Richard Owen true false 2017-05-31 LAWD This article looks at an attempt to enhance students’ critical thinking, professional and personal skills through an innovation in the use of peer assessment on an undergraduate law degree programme. This involved peer assessing asynchronously materials previously submitted. It was also to a limited extent mediated by the tutor as composites of previously submitted work were used to focus on skills development. The innovation’s aim was to enhance student performance. It drew on the existing literature on peer assessment as well as cognitive apprenticeship theory and was premised on the idea that students’ learning will be enhanced if they are better enculturated into the assessment process. It was felt that there was a body of students within the lower performing ranges who did not properly understand assessment criteria and consequently under‐performed. The effectiveness of the innovation was evaluated through student questionnaires (before and after students received their results), a focus group and a qualitative evaluation by the tutor, on the basis of marking the assessments. Whilst the assessment led to an improvement in student performance, reflection on the experience has identified ways in which the potential of this form of assessment can be further developed in the future. Journal Article Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education 1 2 46 55 2050-7003 31 12 2009 2009-12-31 10.1108/17581184200900013 COLLEGE NANME Law COLLEGE CODE LAWD Swansea University 2017-07-13T11:17:17.0804601 2017-05-31T11:54:30.8777121 Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Law Richard Owen 0000-0003-0125-4697 1
title Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment
spellingShingle Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment
Richard Owen
title_short Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment
title_full Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment
title_fullStr Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment
title_full_unstemmed Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment
title_sort Turning the assessed into assessors using asynchronous tutor‐mediated peer assessment
author_id_str_mv e06eaff1456f64c45cc72a85498dabf0
author_id_fullname_str_mv e06eaff1456f64c45cc72a85498dabf0_***_Richard Owen
author Richard Owen
author2 Richard Owen
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education
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publishDate 2009
institution Swansea University
issn 2050-7003
doi_str_mv 10.1108/17581184200900013
college_str Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
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hierarchy_top_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
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hierarchy_parent_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
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description This article looks at an attempt to enhance students’ critical thinking, professional and personal skills through an innovation in the use of peer assessment on an undergraduate law degree programme. This involved peer assessing asynchronously materials previously submitted. It was also to a limited extent mediated by the tutor as composites of previously submitted work were used to focus on skills development. The innovation’s aim was to enhance student performance. It drew on the existing literature on peer assessment as well as cognitive apprenticeship theory and was premised on the idea that students’ learning will be enhanced if they are better enculturated into the assessment process. It was felt that there was a body of students within the lower performing ranges who did not properly understand assessment criteria and consequently under‐performed. The effectiveness of the innovation was evaluated through student questionnaires (before and after students received their results), a focus group and a qualitative evaluation by the tutor, on the basis of marking the assessments. Whilst the assessment led to an improvement in student performance, reflection on the experience has identified ways in which the potential of this form of assessment can be further developed in the future.
published_date 2009-12-31T03:45:49Z
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