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Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects / Rhiannon Forsyth; Owen Guy; Anitha Devadoss

Diagnostics, Volume: 7, Issue: 3, Start page: 45

Swansea University Authors: Owen, Guy, Anitha, Devadoss

Abstract

Since the discovery of the two-dimensional (2D) carbon material, graphene, just over a decade ago, the development of graphene-based field effect transistors (G-FETs) has become a widely researched area, particularly for use in point-of-care biomedical applications. G-FETs are particularly attractiv...

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Published in: Diagnostics
ISSN: 2075-4418
Published: 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa34812
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spelling 2017-10-03T16:19:18.2363556 v2 34812 2017-07-28 Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects c7fa5949b8528e048c5b978005f66794 0000-0002-6449-4033 Owen Guy Owen Guy true false a01150750f1c8eccbfeebffdde3fe8a1 0000-0002-8052-1820 Anitha Devadoss Anitha Devadoss true false 2017-07-28 SCH Since the discovery of the two-dimensional (2D) carbon material, graphene, just over a decade ago, the development of graphene-based field effect transistors (G-FETs) has become a widely researched area, particularly for use in point-of-care biomedical applications. G-FETs are particularly attractive as next generation bioelectronics due to their mass-scalability and low cost of the technology’s manufacture. Furthermore, G-FETs offer the potential to complete label-free, rapid, and highly sensitive analysis coupled with a high sample throughput. These properties, coupled with the potential for integration into portable instrumentation, contribute to G-FETs’ suitability for point-of-care diagnostics. This review focuses on elucidating the recent developments in the field of G-FET sensors that act on a bioaffinity basis, whereby a binding event between a bioreceptor and the target analyte is transduced into an electrical signal at the G-FET surface. Recognizing and quantifying these target analytes accurately and reliably is essential in diagnosing many diseases, therefore it is vital to design the G-FET with care. Taking into account some limitations of the sensor platform, such as Debye–Hükel screening and device surface area, is fundamental in developing improved bioelectronics for applications in the clinical setting. This review highlights some efforts undertaken in facing these limitations in order to bring G-FET development for biomedical applications forward. Journal Article Diagnostics 7 3 45 2075-4418 G-FET (graphene-based field effect transistors); DNA; aptamer; Debye length; antigen binding fragment; Dirac voltage; point-of-care 26 7 2017 2017-07-26 10.3390/diagnostics7030045 http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4418/7/3/45 COLLEGE NANME Chemistry COLLEGE CODE SCH Swansea University 2017-10-03T16:19:18.2363556 2017-07-28T09:05:33.7833888 College of Engineering Engineering Rhiannon Forsyth 1 Owen Guy 0000-0002-6449-4033 2 Anitha Devadoss 0000-0002-8052-1820 3 0034812-03082017102948.pdf forsyth2017.pdf 2017-08-03T10:29:48.6670000 Output 4909478 application/pdf Version of Record true 2017-08-03T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects
spellingShingle Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects
Owen, Guy
Anitha, Devadoss
title_short Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects
title_full Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects
title_fullStr Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects
title_full_unstemmed Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects
title_sort Graphene Field Effect Transistors for Biomedical Applications: Current Status and Future Prospects
author_id_str_mv c7fa5949b8528e048c5b978005f66794
a01150750f1c8eccbfeebffdde3fe8a1
author_id_fullname_str_mv c7fa5949b8528e048c5b978005f66794_***_Owen, Guy
a01150750f1c8eccbfeebffdde3fe8a1_***_Anitha, Devadoss
author Owen, Guy
Anitha, Devadoss
author2 Rhiannon Forsyth
Owen Guy
Anitha Devadoss
format Journal article
container_title Diagnostics
container_volume 7
container_issue 3
container_start_page 45
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 2075-4418
doi_str_mv 10.3390/diagnostics7030045
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
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url http://www.mdpi.com/2075-4418/7/3/45
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description Since the discovery of the two-dimensional (2D) carbon material, graphene, just over a decade ago, the development of graphene-based field effect transistors (G-FETs) has become a widely researched area, particularly for use in point-of-care biomedical applications. G-FETs are particularly attractive as next generation bioelectronics due to their mass-scalability and low cost of the technology’s manufacture. Furthermore, G-FETs offer the potential to complete label-free, rapid, and highly sensitive analysis coupled with a high sample throughput. These properties, coupled with the potential for integration into portable instrumentation, contribute to G-FETs’ suitability for point-of-care diagnostics. This review focuses on elucidating the recent developments in the field of G-FET sensors that act on a bioaffinity basis, whereby a binding event between a bioreceptor and the target analyte is transduced into an electrical signal at the G-FET surface. Recognizing and quantifying these target analytes accurately and reliably is essential in diagnosing many diseases, therefore it is vital to design the G-FET with care. Taking into account some limitations of the sensor platform, such as Debye–Hükel screening and device surface area, is fundamental in developing improved bioelectronics for applications in the clinical setting. This review highlights some efforts undertaken in facing these limitations in order to bring G-FET development for biomedical applications forward.
published_date 2017-07-26T03:58:54Z
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