No Cover Image

Journal article 549 views 71 downloads

An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers / R. E. Hudson, A. J. Holder, Karl Hawkins, Daniel Curtis, Rhodri Williams

Physics of Fluids, Volume: 29, Issue: 12

Swansea University Authors: Karl Hawkins, Daniel Curtis, Rhodri Williams

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1063/1.4993308

Abstract

The rheological characterisation of viscoelastic materials undergoing a sol-gel transition at the Gel Point (GP) has important applications in a wide range of industrial, biological, and clinical environments and can provide information regarding both kinetic and microstructural aspects of gelation....

Full description

Published in: Physics of Fluids
ISSN: 1070-6631 1089-7666
Published: 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa35940
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2017-10-05T19:10:58Z
last_indexed 2020-12-18T03:54:40Z
id cronfa35940
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2020-12-17T10:51:08.2941482</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>35940</id><entry>2017-10-05</entry><title>An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>77c39404a9a98c6e2283d84815cba053</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0174-4151</ORCID><firstname>Karl</firstname><surname>Hawkins</surname><name>Karl Hawkins</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>e76ff28a23af2fe37099c4e9a24c1e58</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-6955-0524</ORCID><firstname>Daniel</firstname><surname>Curtis</surname><name>Daniel Curtis</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>642bf793695f412ed932f1ea4d9bc3f1</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-6912-5288</ORCID><firstname>Rhodri</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><name>Rhodri Williams</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2017-10-05</date><deptcode>BMS</deptcode><abstract>The rheological characterisation of viscoelastic materials undergoing a sol-gel transition at the Gel Point (GP) has important applications in a wide range of industrial, biological, and clinical environments and can provide information regarding both kinetic and microstructural aspects of gelation. The most rigorous basis for identifying the GP involves exploiting the frequency dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the complex shear modulus of the critical gel (the system at the GP) measured under small amplitude oscillatory shear conditions. This approach to GP identification requires that rheological data be obtained over a range of oscillatory shear frequencies. Such measurements are limited by sample mutation considerations (at low frequencies) and, when experiments are conducted using combined motor-transducer (CMT) rheometers, by instrument inertia considerations (at high frequencies). Together, sample mutation and inertia induced artefacts can lead to significant errors in the determination of the GP. Overcoming such artefacts is important, however, as the extension of the range of frequencies available to the experimentalist promises both more accurate GP determination and the ability to study rapidly gelling samples. Herein, we exploit the frequency independent viscoelastic properties of the critical gel to develop and evaluate an enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure. The procedure allows acquisition of valid GP data at previously inaccessible frequencies (using CMT rheometers) and is applied in a study of the concentration dependence of bovine gelatin gelation GP parameters. A previously unreported concentration dependence of the stress relaxation exponent (&#x3B1;) for critical gelatin gels has been identified, which approaches a limiting value (&#x3B1; = 0.7) at low gelatin concentrations, this being in agreement with previous studies and theoretical predictions for percolating systems at the GP.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Physics of Fluids</journal><volume>29</volume><journalNumber>12</journalNumber><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher/><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>1070-6631</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1089-7666</issnElectronic><keywords>Gels, Mechanical stress, Oscillatory shear measurements, Shear modulus, Solgels</keywords><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2017</publishedYear><publishedDate>2017-12-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1063/1.4993308</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Biomedical Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>BMS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2020-12-17T10:51:08.2941482</lastEdited><Created>2017-10-05T13:42:57.0578766</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>R. E.</firstname><surname>Hudson</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>A. J.</firstname><surname>Holder</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Karl</firstname><surname>Hawkins</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0174-4151</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel</firstname><surname>Curtis</surname><orcid>0000-0002-6955-0524</orcid><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Rhodri</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><orcid>0000-0002-6912-5288</orcid><order>5</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0035940-05102017134522.pdf</filename><originalFilename>hudson2017v2.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2017-10-05T13:45:22.8400000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>816110</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2017-10-05T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2020-12-17T10:51:08.2941482 v2 35940 2017-10-05 An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers 77c39404a9a98c6e2283d84815cba053 0000-0003-0174-4151 Karl Hawkins Karl Hawkins true false e76ff28a23af2fe37099c4e9a24c1e58 0000-0002-6955-0524 Daniel Curtis Daniel Curtis true false 642bf793695f412ed932f1ea4d9bc3f1 0000-0002-6912-5288 Rhodri Williams Rhodri Williams true false 2017-10-05 BMS The rheological characterisation of viscoelastic materials undergoing a sol-gel transition at the Gel Point (GP) has important applications in a wide range of industrial, biological, and clinical environments and can provide information regarding both kinetic and microstructural aspects of gelation. The most rigorous basis for identifying the GP involves exploiting the frequency dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the complex shear modulus of the critical gel (the system at the GP) measured under small amplitude oscillatory shear conditions. This approach to GP identification requires that rheological data be obtained over a range of oscillatory shear frequencies. Such measurements are limited by sample mutation considerations (at low frequencies) and, when experiments are conducted using combined motor-transducer (CMT) rheometers, by instrument inertia considerations (at high frequencies). Together, sample mutation and inertia induced artefacts can lead to significant errors in the determination of the GP. Overcoming such artefacts is important, however, as the extension of the range of frequencies available to the experimentalist promises both more accurate GP determination and the ability to study rapidly gelling samples. Herein, we exploit the frequency independent viscoelastic properties of the critical gel to develop and evaluate an enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure. The procedure allows acquisition of valid GP data at previously inaccessible frequencies (using CMT rheometers) and is applied in a study of the concentration dependence of bovine gelatin gelation GP parameters. A previously unreported concentration dependence of the stress relaxation exponent (α) for critical gelatin gels has been identified, which approaches a limiting value (α = 0.7) at low gelatin concentrations, this being in agreement with previous studies and theoretical predictions for percolating systems at the GP. Journal Article Physics of Fluids 29 12 1070-6631 1089-7666 Gels, Mechanical stress, Oscillatory shear measurements, Shear modulus, Solgels 31 12 2017 2017-12-31 10.1063/1.4993308 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University 2020-12-17T10:51:08.2941482 2017-10-05T13:42:57.0578766 College of Engineering Engineering R. E. Hudson 1 A. J. Holder 2 Karl Hawkins 0000-0003-0174-4151 3 Daniel Curtis 0000-0002-6955-0524 4 Rhodri Williams 0000-0002-6912-5288 5 0035940-05102017134522.pdf hudson2017v2.pdf 2017-10-05T13:45:22.8400000 Output 816110 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2017-10-05T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers
spellingShingle An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers
Karl, Hawkins
Daniel, Curtis
Rhodri, Williams
title_short An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers
title_full An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers
title_fullStr An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers
title_full_unstemmed An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers
title_sort An enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure (ERIC) for the study of gelling systems using combined motor-transducer rheometers
author_id_str_mv 77c39404a9a98c6e2283d84815cba053
e76ff28a23af2fe37099c4e9a24c1e58
642bf793695f412ed932f1ea4d9bc3f1
author_id_fullname_str_mv 77c39404a9a98c6e2283d84815cba053_***_Karl, Hawkins
e76ff28a23af2fe37099c4e9a24c1e58_***_Daniel, Curtis
642bf793695f412ed932f1ea4d9bc3f1_***_Rhodri, Williams
author Karl, Hawkins
Daniel, Curtis
Rhodri, Williams
author2 R. E. Hudson
A. J. Holder
Karl Hawkins
Daniel Curtis
Rhodri Williams
format Journal article
container_title Physics of Fluids
container_volume 29
container_issue 12
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 1070-6631
1089-7666
doi_str_mv 10.1063/1.4993308
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The rheological characterisation of viscoelastic materials undergoing a sol-gel transition at the Gel Point (GP) has important applications in a wide range of industrial, biological, and clinical environments and can provide information regarding both kinetic and microstructural aspects of gelation. The most rigorous basis for identifying the GP involves exploiting the frequency dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the complex shear modulus of the critical gel (the system at the GP) measured under small amplitude oscillatory shear conditions. This approach to GP identification requires that rheological data be obtained over a range of oscillatory shear frequencies. Such measurements are limited by sample mutation considerations (at low frequencies) and, when experiments are conducted using combined motor-transducer (CMT) rheometers, by instrument inertia considerations (at high frequencies). Together, sample mutation and inertia induced artefacts can lead to significant errors in the determination of the GP. Overcoming such artefacts is important, however, as the extension of the range of frequencies available to the experimentalist promises both more accurate GP determination and the ability to study rapidly gelling samples. Herein, we exploit the frequency independent viscoelastic properties of the critical gel to develop and evaluate an enhanced rheometer inertia correction procedure. The procedure allows acquisition of valid GP data at previously inaccessible frequencies (using CMT rheometers) and is applied in a study of the concentration dependence of bovine gelatin gelation GP parameters. A previously unreported concentration dependence of the stress relaxation exponent (α) for critical gelatin gels has been identified, which approaches a limiting value (α = 0.7) at low gelatin concentrations, this being in agreement with previous studies and theoretical predictions for percolating systems at the GP.
published_date 2017-12-31T03:54:29Z
_version_ 1714739760957751296
score 10.830351