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In vivo comparison of jellyfish and bovine collagen sponges as prototype medical devices / Jonathan P. Widdowson; Alex J. Picton; Valerie Vince; Chris J. Wright; Andrew Mearns-Spragg

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, Volume: 106, Issue: 4, Pages: 1524 - 1533

Swansea University Author: Widdowson, Jonathan

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/jbm.b.33959

Abstract

Jellyfish have emerged as a source of next generation collagen that is an attractive alternative to existing sources, such as bovine and porcine, due to a plentiful supply and providing a safer source through lack of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) transmission risk and potential viral vector...

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Published in: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials
ISSN: 1552-4973
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa39891
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Abstract: Jellyfish have emerged as a source of next generation collagen that is an attractive alternative to existing sources, such as bovine and porcine, due to a plentiful supply and providing a safer source through lack of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) transmission risk and potential viral vectors, both of which could be transmitted to humans. Here we compare collagen implantable sponges derived for the first time from the Rhizostoma pulmo jellyfish. A further novelty for the research was that there was a comparison for sponges that were either uncrosslinked or crosslinked using 1‐ethyl‐3‐(3‐dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC), and an assessment on how this affected resorption, as well as their biocompatibility compared to bovine type I collagen sponges. The scaffolds were prepared and examined using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The samples were implanted in adult male Wistar rats for in vivo experimentation. Both crosslinked and uncrosslinked jellyfish collagen sponges showed a significant reduction in histopathology scores over the course of the study, whereas the bovine collagen sponge scores were not significantly reduced. Both jellyfish collagen sponges and the bovine sponge were tolerated well by the hosts, and a recovery was visible in all samples, suggesting that R. pulmo jellyfish‐derived collagen could offer compelling biocompatibility with wound healing applications. We also demonstrate that noncrosslinked samples could be safer with better resorption times than crosslinked samples.
Keywords: jellyfish collagen, in vivo, regenerative medicine, collagen implantation, biomaterials
Issue: 4
Start Page: 1524
End Page: 1533