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Electric Vehicle Mobility as-a-Service: Exploring the 'Tri-Opt' of Novel Private Transport Business Models / Peter Cooper; Theo Tryfonas; Tom Crick; Alex Marsh

Journal of Urban Technology

Swansea University Author: Crick, Tom

DOI (Published version): 10.1080/10630732.2018.1553096

Abstract

Three distinct trends have emerged that have disrupted the dominance of privately-owned, combustion-powered car transport in the UK. First, the electric powertrain has emerged as an affordable means of transport, with the potential to address many pump- to-tire shortcomings, especially CO2 emissions...

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Published in: Journal of Urban Technology
Published: Taylor & Francis 2018
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa44924
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Abstract: Three distinct trends have emerged that have disrupted the dominance of privately-owned, combustion-powered car transport in the UK. First, the electric powertrain has emerged as an affordable means of transport, with the potential to address many pump- to-tire shortcomings, especially CO2 emissions, air and noise pollution. Second, new models of car ownership are developing: hiring a car for single journeys, addressing systematic impacts such as residential parking, purchase-justifying-use and social division. Third, the growth of 'smart city' thinking emphasises capitalising on increased connectivity and data availability to create value. We define the combination of these three trends as the 'tri-opt' of private transport – three disruptors that should not be considered in isolation but as interacting – an inflection of the 'Energy Trilemma'.This paper applies systems thinking and a mixed methodology of workshops, interviews and systems modelling to the UK city of Bristol’s Smart EV Transport Hub project to identify concepts that positively combine two or more of these three 'opts'. Subsequently, the use cases are evaluated qualitatively for their perceived value. Segmentation is subsequently undertaken to characterise and generalise groups of concepts to inform recommended stakeholder actions. We demonstrate that there are many synergistic overlaps and that combinations potentially create significant value. Those use cases that the current literature has explored the least are of the greatest perceived value. They can be characterised as requiring significant public and private sector collaboration. We thus recommend that public-private sector collaboration in private transport – particularly at the intersection of electric vehicles, smart cities and mobility-as-a-service – is prioritised for further investigation.
Keywords: Electric Vehicles, Vehicle Hire Models, Smart Monitoring, Business Models, Mobility-as-a-Service
College: College of Human and Health Sciences