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Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation

Laura B. Thomas, Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo, Emily J. Oliver

Journal of Motivation, Emotion, and Personality: Reversal Theory Studies, Volume: 7, Pages: 33 - 47

Swansea University Author: Joanne Hudson Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.12689/jmep.2018.704

Abstract

Motivation quality affects the initiation and maintenance of behavior and physical and psychological health. Despite this, we understand little about how situational fluctuations occur and are regulated. In this paper we analyze the utility of applying basic psychological needs theory (a sub theory...

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Published in: Journal of Motivation, Emotion, and Personality: Reversal Theory Studies
ISSN: 1059-9495
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa47918
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first_indexed 2018-12-10T14:27:20Z
last_indexed 2020-06-26T18:58:25Z
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spelling 2020-06-26T14:19:27.3570777 v2 47918 2018-12-10 Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99 0000-0003-4732-8356 Joanne Hudson Joanne Hudson true false 2018-12-10 STSC Motivation quality affects the initiation and maintenance of behavior and physical and psychological health. Despite this, we understand little about how situational fluctuations occur and are regulated. In this paper we analyze the utility of applying basic psychological needs theory (a sub theory of self-determination theory) and reversal theory as frameworks for understanding motivational dynamics. Specifically, we posit a causal model linking acute consequences of need satisfaction and the purpose and direction of meta-motivational state shifts. This model is tested in two sequential experiments, demonstrating: (i) that thwarting or satisfying psychological needs increases meta-motivational reversal frequency and (ii) that individuals use meta-motivational shifts to compensate for imbalances in need satisfaction. Broad-ranging implications include informing therapeutic support for preventing maladaptive emotions and behaviors and promoting psychological health and well-being. In respect to modelling the dynamics of human motivation, this study adds clarity to understanding when (following need deprivation), why (to regain and balance need satisfaction), and how (through changing metamotivational states) we self-regulate. Journal Article Journal of Motivation, Emotion, and Personality: Reversal Theory Studies 7 33 47 1059-9495 self determination theory; reversal theory; dynamic motivation; balanced need satisfaction; need restoration 13 1 2019 2019-01-13 10.12689/jmep.2018.704 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-06-26T14:19:27.3570777 2018-12-10T09:43:19.4328167 College of Engineering Sports Science Laura B. Thomas 1 Joanne Hudson 0000-0003-4732-8356 2 Emily J. Oliver 3 47918__12582__0392f9821c8b4fa4b20702bfeab07826.pdf thomas2019v2.pdf 2019-01-22T15:06:08.8300000 Output 8216381 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-01-22T00:00:00.0000000 Distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution, No Derivatives license (CC-BY-ND 3.0) true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/
title Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation
spellingShingle Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation
Joanne Hudson
title_short Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation
title_full Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation
title_fullStr Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation
title_full_unstemmed Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation
title_sort Modelling Motivational Dynamics: Demonstrating When, Why, and How We Self-Regulate Motivation
author_id_str_mv 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 304341cf2cd1bdb99d7d6ccf0f030d99_***_Joanne Hudson
author Joanne Hudson
author2 Laura B. Thomas
Joanne Hudson
Emily J. Oliver
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Motivation, Emotion, and Personality: Reversal Theory Studies
container_volume 7
container_start_page 33
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 1059-9495
doi_str_mv 10.12689/jmep.2018.704
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
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description Motivation quality affects the initiation and maintenance of behavior and physical and psychological health. Despite this, we understand little about how situational fluctuations occur and are regulated. In this paper we analyze the utility of applying basic psychological needs theory (a sub theory of self-determination theory) and reversal theory as frameworks for understanding motivational dynamics. Specifically, we posit a causal model linking acute consequences of need satisfaction and the purpose and direction of meta-motivational state shifts. This model is tested in two sequential experiments, demonstrating: (i) that thwarting or satisfying psychological needs increases meta-motivational reversal frequency and (ii) that individuals use meta-motivational shifts to compensate for imbalances in need satisfaction. Broad-ranging implications include informing therapeutic support for preventing maladaptive emotions and behaviors and promoting psychological health and well-being. In respect to modelling the dynamics of human motivation, this study adds clarity to understanding when (following need deprivation), why (to regain and balance need satisfaction), and how (through changing metamotivational states) we self-regulate.
published_date 2019-01-13T04:00:33Z
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score 10.8781185