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Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice / Llewellyn Morgan; Jo Rees; Helen Williams; Clare Hartshorn

Swansea University Author: Morgan, Llewellyn

Abstract

Morgan & Spargo (2017) identify that nurses feel underprepared by their undergraduate education to work in the field of safeguarding children. Furthermore, Bennett, Plint, & Clifford (2005), Pabiś, Wrońska, Ślusarska, & Cuber (2010) also report particularly for children’s nurses that the...

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Published: Calgary (Alberta), Canada Sigma's 30th International Nursing Research Congress
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa48567
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-05-13T09:12:58Z</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>48567</id><entry>2019-01-25</entry><title>Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice</title><alternativeTitle></alternativeTitle><author>Llewellyn Morgan</author><firstname>Llewellyn</firstname><surname>Morgan</surname><active>true</active><ORCID>0000-0002-0964-1715</ORCID><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent><sid>b4d0f5ddd52ffb053ec3cf3b00b10702</sid><email>c68261c133750c0fa3a5478924926ae0</email><emailaddr>8aZe8PmRr8ov9XsX7sPxGcjwe531u+mO/3IG3xe5jMg=</emailaddr><date>2019-01-25</date><deptcode>HNU</deptcode><abstract>Morgan &amp; Spargo (2017) identify that nurses feel underprepared by their undergraduate education to work in the field of safeguarding children. Furthermore, Bennett, Plint, &amp; Clifford (2005), Pabi&#x15B;, Wro&#x144;ska, &#x15A;lusarska, &amp; Cuber (2010) also report particularly for children&#x2019;s nurses that they have limited exposure to safeguarding during their pre-registration education. Morgan &amp; Spargo (2017) further identify that this maybe as a result of qualified practitioner reluctance to allow those students to participate in safeguarding children practice.Thus, as educationalists we need to explore ways to address this, and approach safeguarding education differently. Murphy (2004) and Munro (2008) suggest that collaborative and interprofessional education should also feature within safeguarding education. Logan, Qui&#xF1;ones, &amp; Sunderland (2015), Houston &amp; Thompson (2017) and Wood &amp; Perlman (2017) suggest that students learn and are able to apply information when it is based upon realistic situations. They extol the benefits of authentic learning which allow for students to develop transferrable skills which they can feed forward into future clinical practice.This presentation reports on the implementation of a pilot project to address preparation for safeguarding work with final year undergraduate children&#x2019;s nursing students and student social workers at one Higher Education Institute located in South West Wales in the UK. The authentic learning modality adopts recognized safeguarding procedures (in this case the All Wales Child Protection Procedures (2008)) to guide the participatory learning event using simulation. This will utilize a &#x201C;professional strategy discussion&#x201D; alongside a simulated &#x201C;initial child protection case conference&#x201D;. The rationale for selection is that anecdotally students often self-report that these two activities cause them the most anxiety because of rationalising their decision-making processes when questioned, and they lack understanding of these process requirements.A total of 70 students (mixed groups of student children&#x2019;s nurses and student social workers) participated in this learning event. Mixed groups were utilized, to allow for discussion and ideas to be formulated and explored, based upon different role viewpoints. These mixed groups were facilitated by professionals and academics, with relevant professional expertise, in order to effectively manage discussions and address individual participant concerns. The formal evaluation of this initial pilot learning event forms the content of the presentation for this conference. This will also feed forward to future and further planned ongoing research.</abstract><type>Conference contribution</type><journal></journal><volume/><journalNumber/><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher>Sigma's 30th International Nursing Research Congress</publisher><placeOfPublication>Calgary (Alberta), Canada</placeOfPublication><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic/><keywords>Interdisciplinary, Children's Nursing, Social Work, Education, Safeguarding Children</keywords><publishedDay>0</publishedDay><publishedMonth>0</publishedMonth><publishedYear>0</publishedYear><publishedDate>0001-01-01</publishedDate><doi></doi><url></url><notes>This is due to be presented 25-29th July 2019. As such the presentation is not yet available as is currently in development</notes><college>College of Human and Health Sciences</college><department>Nursing</department><CollegeCode>CHHS</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HNU</DepartmentCode><institution/><researchGroup>None</researchGroup><supervisor/><sponsorsfunders/><grantnumber/><degreelevel/><degreename>None</degreename><lastEdited>2019-05-13T09:12:58Z</lastEdited><Created>2019-01-25T12:28:50Z</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Nursing</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Llewellyn</firstname><surname>Morgan</surname><orcid/><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Jo</firstname><surname>Rees</surname><orcid/><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Helen</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><orcid/><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Clare</firstname><surname>Hartshorn</surname><orcid/><order>4</order></author></authors><documents/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-05-13T09:12:58Z v2 48567 2019-01-25 Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice Llewellyn Morgan Llewellyn Morgan true 0000-0002-0964-1715 false b4d0f5ddd52ffb053ec3cf3b00b10702 c68261c133750c0fa3a5478924926ae0 8aZe8PmRr8ov9XsX7sPxGcjwe531u+mO/3IG3xe5jMg= 2019-01-25 HNU Morgan & Spargo (2017) identify that nurses feel underprepared by their undergraduate education to work in the field of safeguarding children. Furthermore, Bennett, Plint, & Clifford (2005), Pabiś, Wrońska, Ślusarska, & Cuber (2010) also report particularly for children’s nurses that they have limited exposure to safeguarding during their pre-registration education. Morgan & Spargo (2017) further identify that this maybe as a result of qualified practitioner reluctance to allow those students to participate in safeguarding children practice.Thus, as educationalists we need to explore ways to address this, and approach safeguarding education differently. Murphy (2004) and Munro (2008) suggest that collaborative and interprofessional education should also feature within safeguarding education. Logan, Quiñones, & Sunderland (2015), Houston & Thompson (2017) and Wood & Perlman (2017) suggest that students learn and are able to apply information when it is based upon realistic situations. They extol the benefits of authentic learning which allow for students to develop transferrable skills which they can feed forward into future clinical practice.This presentation reports on the implementation of a pilot project to address preparation for safeguarding work with final year undergraduate children’s nursing students and student social workers at one Higher Education Institute located in South West Wales in the UK. The authentic learning modality adopts recognized safeguarding procedures (in this case the All Wales Child Protection Procedures (2008)) to guide the participatory learning event using simulation. This will utilize a “professional strategy discussion” alongside a simulated “initial child protection case conference”. The rationale for selection is that anecdotally students often self-report that these two activities cause them the most anxiety because of rationalising their decision-making processes when questioned, and they lack understanding of these process requirements.A total of 70 students (mixed groups of student children’s nurses and student social workers) participated in this learning event. Mixed groups were utilized, to allow for discussion and ideas to be formulated and explored, based upon different role viewpoints. These mixed groups were facilitated by professionals and academics, with relevant professional expertise, in order to effectively manage discussions and address individual participant concerns. The formal evaluation of this initial pilot learning event forms the content of the presentation for this conference. This will also feed forward to future and further planned ongoing research. Conference contribution Sigma's 30th International Nursing Research Congress Calgary (Alberta), Canada Interdisciplinary, Children's Nursing, Social Work, Education, Safeguarding Children 0 0 0 0001-01-01 This is due to be presented 25-29th July 2019. As such the presentation is not yet available as is currently in development College of Human and Health Sciences Nursing CHHS HNU None None 2019-05-13T09:12:58Z 2019-01-25T12:28:50Z College of Human and Health Sciences Nursing Llewellyn Morgan 1 Jo Rees 2 Helen Williams 3 Clare Hartshorn 4
title Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice
spellingShingle Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice
Morgan, Llewellyn
title_short Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice
title_full Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice
title_fullStr Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice
title_full_unstemmed Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice
title_sort Interprofessional Collaborative Education: Undergraduate Nursing and Social Work Students Preparation for Safeguarding Children Practice
author_id_str_mv b4d0f5ddd52ffb053ec3cf3b00b10702
author_id_fullname_str_mv b4d0f5ddd52ffb053ec3cf3b00b10702_***_Morgan, Llewellyn
author Morgan, Llewellyn
author2 Llewellyn Morgan
Jo Rees
Helen Williams
Clare Hartshorn
format Conference contribution
institution Swansea University
publisher Sigma's 30th International Nursing Research Congress
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Nursing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Nursing
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description Morgan & Spargo (2017) identify that nurses feel underprepared by their undergraduate education to work in the field of safeguarding children. Furthermore, Bennett, Plint, & Clifford (2005), Pabiś, Wrońska, Ślusarska, & Cuber (2010) also report particularly for children’s nurses that they have limited exposure to safeguarding during their pre-registration education. Morgan & Spargo (2017) further identify that this maybe as a result of qualified practitioner reluctance to allow those students to participate in safeguarding children practice.Thus, as educationalists we need to explore ways to address this, and approach safeguarding education differently. Murphy (2004) and Munro (2008) suggest that collaborative and interprofessional education should also feature within safeguarding education. Logan, Quiñones, & Sunderland (2015), Houston & Thompson (2017) and Wood & Perlman (2017) suggest that students learn and are able to apply information when it is based upon realistic situations. They extol the benefits of authentic learning which allow for students to develop transferrable skills which they can feed forward into future clinical practice.This presentation reports on the implementation of a pilot project to address preparation for safeguarding work with final year undergraduate children’s nursing students and student social workers at one Higher Education Institute located in South West Wales in the UK. The authentic learning modality adopts recognized safeguarding procedures (in this case the All Wales Child Protection Procedures (2008)) to guide the participatory learning event using simulation. This will utilize a “professional strategy discussion” alongside a simulated “initial child protection case conference”. The rationale for selection is that anecdotally students often self-report that these two activities cause them the most anxiety because of rationalising their decision-making processes when questioned, and they lack understanding of these process requirements.A total of 70 students (mixed groups of student children’s nurses and student social workers) participated in this learning event. Mixed groups were utilized, to allow for discussion and ideas to be formulated and explored, based upon different role viewpoints. These mixed groups were facilitated by professionals and academics, with relevant professional expertise, in order to effectively manage discussions and address individual participant concerns. The formal evaluation of this initial pilot learning event forms the content of the presentation for this conference. This will also feed forward to future and further planned ongoing research.
published_date 0001-01-01T13:58:58Z
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