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A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry

Samuel P. Hills, Steve Barrett, Richard G. Feltbower, Martin J. Barwood, Jon N. Radcliffe, Carlton B. Cooke, Liam Kilduff Orcid Logo, Christian J. Cook, Mark Russell

PLOS ONE, Volume: 14, Issue: 1, Start page: e0211563

Swansea University Author: Liam Kilduff Orcid Logo

Abstract

Whilst the movement demands of players completing a whole soccer match have been well-documented, comparable information relating to substitutes is sparse. Therefore, this study profiled the match-day physical activities performed by soccer substitutes, focusing separately on the pre and post pitch-...

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Published in: PLOS ONE
ISSN: 1932-6203
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa48604
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-03-11T15:12:30.0781342</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>48604</id><entry>2019-01-29</entry><title>A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-9449-2293</ORCID><firstname>Liam</firstname><surname>Kilduff</surname><name>Liam Kilduff</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2019-01-29</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>Whilst the movement demands of players completing a whole soccer match have been well-documented, comparable information relating to substitutes is sparse. Therefore, this study profiled the match-day physical activities performed by soccer substitutes, focusing separately on the pre and post pitch-entry periods. Seventeen English Championship soccer players were monitored using 10 Hz Micromechanical Electrical Systems (MEMS) devices during 13 matches in which they participated as substitutes (35 observations). Twenty physical variables were examined and data were organised by bouts of warm-up activity (pre pitch-entry), and five min epochs of match-play (post pitch-entry). Linear mixed modelling assessed the influence of time (i.e., &#x2018;bout&#x2019; and &#x2018;epoch&#x2019;), playing position, and match scoreline. Substitutes performed 3&#xB1;1 rewarm-up bouts&#x2219;player-1&#x2219;match-1. Compared to the initial warm-up, each rewarm-up was shorter (-19.7 to -22.9 min) and elicited less distance (-606 to -741 m), whilst relative total distances were higher (+26 to +69 m&#x2219;min-1). Relative total (+13.4 m&#x2219;min-1) and high-speed (+0.4 m&#x2219;min-1) distances covered during rewarm-ups increased (p &lt;0.001) with proximity to pitch-entry. Players covered more (+3.2 m; p = 0.047) high-speed distance per rewarm-up when the assessed team was losing compared with when winning at the time of pitch-entry. For 10 out of 20 variables measured after pitch-entry, values reduced from 0&#x2013;5 min thereafter, and substitutes covered greater (p &#x2C2;0.05) total (+67 to +93 m) and high-speed (+14 to +33 m) distances during the first five min of match-play versus all subsequent epochs. Midfielders covered more distance (+41 m) per five min epoch than both attackers (p &#x2C2;0.001) and defenders (p = 0.016). Acknowledging the limitations of a solely movement data approach and the potential influence of other match-specific factors, such findings provide novel insights into the match-day demands faced by substitute soccer players. Future research opportunities exist to better understand the match-day practices of this population.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>PLOS ONE</journal><volume>14</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><paginationStart>e0211563</paginationStart><publisher/><issnElectronic>1932-6203</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>1</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2019</publishedYear><publishedDate>2019-01-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1371/journal.pone.0211563</doi><url/><notes>Data Availability Statement: Data cannot be shared publicly because it relates to a professionalsports team. Data are available from the Leeds Trinity University Ethics Committee (ethicscommittee@leedstrinity.ac.uk, www.leedstrinity.ac.uk) for researchers who meet the criteria for access to confidential data. The underlying reasons relate to the fact that the dataitself contains information that could be identifiable when combined with information that is publicly available (e.g., team line-ups, timing of substitutions etc.), and given the sample size recruited in the study, and the identification of the club involved (by deducing from the authoraffiliations). Accordingly, the School of Social and Health Sciences sub-committee of the LeedsTrinity University ethics board requested that they be contacted in the event that such data were to be shared outside of the named research team.</notes><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2019-03-11T15:12:30.0781342</lastEdited><Created>2019-01-29T08:39:38.1746505</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Samuel P.</firstname><surname>Hills</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Steve</firstname><surname>Barrett</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Richard G.</firstname><surname>Feltbower</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Martin J.</firstname><surname>Barwood</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Jon N.</firstname><surname>Radcliffe</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Carlton B.</firstname><surname>Cooke</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Liam</firstname><surname>Kilduff</surname><orcid>0000-0001-9449-2293</orcid><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Christian J.</firstname><surname>Cook</surname><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Mark</firstname><surname>Russell</surname><order>9</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0048604-11022019100341.pdf</filename><originalFilename>hills2019(2)v2.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2019-02-11T10:03:41.1900000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>7672176</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2019-02-11T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-03-11T15:12:30.0781342 v2 48604 2019-01-29 A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98 0000-0001-9449-2293 Liam Kilduff Liam Kilduff true false 2019-01-29 STSC Whilst the movement demands of players completing a whole soccer match have been well-documented, comparable information relating to substitutes is sparse. Therefore, this study profiled the match-day physical activities performed by soccer substitutes, focusing separately on the pre and post pitch-entry periods. Seventeen English Championship soccer players were monitored using 10 Hz Micromechanical Electrical Systems (MEMS) devices during 13 matches in which they participated as substitutes (35 observations). Twenty physical variables were examined and data were organised by bouts of warm-up activity (pre pitch-entry), and five min epochs of match-play (post pitch-entry). Linear mixed modelling assessed the influence of time (i.e., ‘bout’ and ‘epoch’), playing position, and match scoreline. Substitutes performed 3±1 rewarm-up bouts∙player-1∙match-1. Compared to the initial warm-up, each rewarm-up was shorter (-19.7 to -22.9 min) and elicited less distance (-606 to -741 m), whilst relative total distances were higher (+26 to +69 m∙min-1). Relative total (+13.4 m∙min-1) and high-speed (+0.4 m∙min-1) distances covered during rewarm-ups increased (p <0.001) with proximity to pitch-entry. Players covered more (+3.2 m; p = 0.047) high-speed distance per rewarm-up when the assessed team was losing compared with when winning at the time of pitch-entry. For 10 out of 20 variables measured after pitch-entry, values reduced from 0–5 min thereafter, and substitutes covered greater (p ˂0.05) total (+67 to +93 m) and high-speed (+14 to +33 m) distances during the first five min of match-play versus all subsequent epochs. Midfielders covered more distance (+41 m) per five min epoch than both attackers (p ˂0.001) and defenders (p = 0.016). Acknowledging the limitations of a solely movement data approach and the potential influence of other match-specific factors, such findings provide novel insights into the match-day demands faced by substitute soccer players. Future research opportunities exist to better understand the match-day practices of this population. Journal Article PLOS ONE 14 1 e0211563 1932-6203 31 1 2019 2019-01-31 10.1371/journal.pone.0211563 Data Availability Statement: Data cannot be shared publicly because it relates to a professionalsports team. Data are available from the Leeds Trinity University Ethics Committee (ethicscommittee@leedstrinity.ac.uk, www.leedstrinity.ac.uk) for researchers who meet the criteria for access to confidential data. The underlying reasons relate to the fact that the dataitself contains information that could be identifiable when combined with information that is publicly available (e.g., team line-ups, timing of substitutions etc.), and given the sample size recruited in the study, and the identification of the club involved (by deducing from the authoraffiliations). Accordingly, the School of Social and Health Sciences sub-committee of the LeedsTrinity University ethics board requested that they be contacted in the event that such data were to be shared outside of the named research team. COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-03-11T15:12:30.0781342 2019-01-29T08:39:38.1746505 College of Engineering Sports Science Samuel P. Hills 1 Steve Barrett 2 Richard G. Feltbower 3 Martin J. Barwood 4 Jon N. Radcliffe 5 Carlton B. Cooke 6 Liam Kilduff 0000-0001-9449-2293 7 Christian J. Cook 8 Mark Russell 9 0048604-11022019100341.pdf hills2019(2)v2.pdf 2019-02-11T10:03:41.1900000 Output 7672176 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-02-11T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry
spellingShingle A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry
Liam Kilduff
title_short A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry
title_full A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry
title_fullStr A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry
title_full_unstemmed A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry
title_sort A match-day analysis of the movement profiles of substitutes from a professional soccer club before and after pitch-entry
author_id_str_mv 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98
author_id_fullname_str_mv 972ed9a1dda7a0de20581a0f8350be98_***_Liam Kilduff
author Liam Kilduff
author2 Samuel P. Hills
Steve Barrett
Richard G. Feltbower
Martin J. Barwood
Jon N. Radcliffe
Carlton B. Cooke
Liam Kilduff
Christian J. Cook
Mark Russell
format Journal article
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publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 1932-6203
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college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
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description Whilst the movement demands of players completing a whole soccer match have been well-documented, comparable information relating to substitutes is sparse. Therefore, this study profiled the match-day physical activities performed by soccer substitutes, focusing separately on the pre and post pitch-entry periods. Seventeen English Championship soccer players were monitored using 10 Hz Micromechanical Electrical Systems (MEMS) devices during 13 matches in which they participated as substitutes (35 observations). Twenty physical variables were examined and data were organised by bouts of warm-up activity (pre pitch-entry), and five min epochs of match-play (post pitch-entry). Linear mixed modelling assessed the influence of time (i.e., ‘bout’ and ‘epoch’), playing position, and match scoreline. Substitutes performed 3±1 rewarm-up bouts∙player-1∙match-1. Compared to the initial warm-up, each rewarm-up was shorter (-19.7 to -22.9 min) and elicited less distance (-606 to -741 m), whilst relative total distances were higher (+26 to +69 m∙min-1). Relative total (+13.4 m∙min-1) and high-speed (+0.4 m∙min-1) distances covered during rewarm-ups increased (p <0.001) with proximity to pitch-entry. Players covered more (+3.2 m; p = 0.047) high-speed distance per rewarm-up when the assessed team was losing compared with when winning at the time of pitch-entry. For 10 out of 20 variables measured after pitch-entry, values reduced from 0–5 min thereafter, and substitutes covered greater (p ˂0.05) total (+67 to +93 m) and high-speed (+14 to +33 m) distances during the first five min of match-play versus all subsequent epochs. Midfielders covered more distance (+41 m) per five min epoch than both attackers (p ˂0.001) and defenders (p = 0.016). Acknowledging the limitations of a solely movement data approach and the potential influence of other match-specific factors, such findings provide novel insights into the match-day demands faced by substitute soccer players. Future research opportunities exist to better understand the match-day practices of this population.
published_date 2019-01-31T04:01:25Z
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