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Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis / Nils Swindell; Paul Rees; Mikael Fogelholm; Mathijs Drummen; Ian MacDonald; J. Alfredo Martinez; Santiago Navas-Carretero; Teodora Handjieva-Darlenska; Nadka Boyadjieva; Georgi Bogdanov; Sally D. Poppitt; Nicholas Gant; Marta P. Silvestre; Jennie Brand-Miller; Wolfgang Schlicht; Roslyn Muirhead; Shannon Brodie; Heikki Tikkanen; Elli Jalo; Margriet Westerterp-Plantenga; Tanja Adam; Pia Siig Vestentoft; Thomas M. Larsen; Anne Raben; Gareth Stratton

International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Volume: 17, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Nils, Swindell, Paul, Rees, Gareth, Stratton

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Abstract

BackgroundPhysical activity, sedentary time and sleep have been shown to be associated with cardio-metabolic health. However, these associations are typically studied in isolation or without accounting for the effect of all movement behaviours and the constrained nature of data that comprise a finit...

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Published in: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
ISSN: 1479-5868
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2020
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However, these associations are typically studied in isolation or without accounting for the effect of all movement behaviours and the constrained nature of data that comprise a finite whole such as a 24&#x2009;h&#x2009;day. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between the composition of daily movement behaviours (including sleep, sedentary time (ST), light intensity physical activity (LIPA) and moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA)) and cardio-metabolic health, in a cross-sectional analysis of adults with pre-diabetes. Further, we quantified the predicted differences following reallocation of time between behaviours.MethodsAccelerometers were used to quantify daily movement behaviours in 1462 adults from eight countries with a body mass index (BMI) &#x2265;25&#x2009;kg&#xB7;m&#x2212;&#x2009;2, impaired fasting glucose (IFG; 5.6&#x2013;6.9&#x2009;mmol&#xB7;l&#x2212;&#x2009;1) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 7.8&#x2013;11.0&#x2009;mmol&#x2022;l&#x2212;&#x2009;1 2&#x2009;h following oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT). Compositional isotemporal substitution was used to estimate the association of reallocating time between behaviours.ResultsReplacing MVPA with any other behaviour around the mean composition was associated with a poorer cardio-metabolic risk profile. Conversely, when MVPA was increased, the relationships with cardiometabolic risk markers was favourable but with smaller predicted changes than when MVPA was replaced. Further, substituting ST with LIPA predicted improvements in cardio-metabolic risk markers, most notably insulin and HOMA-IR.ConclusionsThis is the first study to use compositional analysis of the 24&#x2009;h movement composition in adults with overweight/obesity and pre-diabetes. These findings build on previous literature that suggest replacing ST with LIPA may produce metabolic benefits that contribute to the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the asymmetry in the predicted change in risk markers following the reallocation of time to/from MVPA highlights the importance of maintaining existing levels of MVPA.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity</journal><volume>17</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><publisher>Springer Science and Business Media LLC</publisher><issnElectronic>1479-5868</issnElectronic><keywords>Physical activity; Sedentary time; Compositional analysis; Pre-diabetes</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2020</publishedYear><publishedDate>2020-12-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1186/s12966-020-00936-5</doi><url>http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-00936-5</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Engineering</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>EEN</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2020-02-21T13:57:39.7115259</lastEdited><Created>2020-02-21T13:57:39.7115259</Created><authors><author><firstname>Nils</firstname><surname>Swindell</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Paul</firstname><surname>Rees</surname><orcid>0000-0002-7715-6914</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Mikael</firstname><surname>Fogelholm</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Mathijs</firstname><surname>Drummen</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Ian</firstname><surname>MacDonald</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>J. Alfredo</firstname><surname>Martinez</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Santiago</firstname><surname>Navas-Carretero</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Teodora</firstname><surname>Handjieva-Darlenska</surname><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Nadka</firstname><surname>Boyadjieva</surname><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Georgi</firstname><surname>Bogdanov</surname><order>10</order></author><author><firstname>Sally D.</firstname><surname>Poppitt</surname><order>11</order></author><author><firstname>Nicholas</firstname><surname>Gant</surname><order>12</order></author><author><firstname>Marta P.</firstname><surname>Silvestre</surname><order>13</order></author><author><firstname>Jennie</firstname><surname>Brand-Miller</surname><order>14</order></author><author><firstname>Wolfgang</firstname><surname>Schlicht</surname><order>15</order></author><author><firstname>Roslyn</firstname><surname>Muirhead</surname><order>16</order></author><author><firstname>Shannon</firstname><surname>Brodie</surname><order>17</order></author><author><firstname>Heikki</firstname><surname>Tikkanen</surname><order>18</order></author><author><firstname>Elli</firstname><surname>Jalo</surname><order>19</order></author><author><firstname>Margriet</firstname><surname>Westerterp-Plantenga</surname><order>20</order></author><author><firstname>Tanja</firstname><surname>Adam</surname><order>21</order></author><author><firstname>Pia Siig</firstname><surname>Vestentoft</surname><order>22</order></author><author><firstname>Thomas M.</firstname><surname>Larsen</surname><order>23</order></author><author><firstname>Anne</firstname><surname>Raben</surname><order>24</order></author><author><firstname>Gareth</firstname><surname>Stratton</surname><orcid>0000-0001-5618-0803</orcid><order>25</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>53619__16779__5cf78d8dd7f14291ac4755adeca1dd0b.pdf</filename><originalFilename>53619.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2020-03-05T16:09:31.2485312</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>555433</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><documentNotes>Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY).</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2020-02-21T13:57:39.7115259 v2 53619 2020-02-21 Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis d89a0a3fb118e1cf625fddc68cdf25bb Nils Swindell Nils Swindell true false 537a2fe031a796a3bde99679ee8c24f5 0000-0002-7715-6914 Paul Rees Paul Rees true false 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false 2020-02-21 EEN BackgroundPhysical activity, sedentary time and sleep have been shown to be associated with cardio-metabolic health. However, these associations are typically studied in isolation or without accounting for the effect of all movement behaviours and the constrained nature of data that comprise a finite whole such as a 24 h day. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between the composition of daily movement behaviours (including sleep, sedentary time (ST), light intensity physical activity (LIPA) and moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA)) and cardio-metabolic health, in a cross-sectional analysis of adults with pre-diabetes. Further, we quantified the predicted differences following reallocation of time between behaviours.MethodsAccelerometers were used to quantify daily movement behaviours in 1462 adults from eight countries with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg·m− 2, impaired fasting glucose (IFG; 5.6–6.9 mmol·l− 1) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 7.8–11.0 mmol•l− 1 2 h following oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT). Compositional isotemporal substitution was used to estimate the association of reallocating time between behaviours.ResultsReplacing MVPA with any other behaviour around the mean composition was associated with a poorer cardio-metabolic risk profile. Conversely, when MVPA was increased, the relationships with cardiometabolic risk markers was favourable but with smaller predicted changes than when MVPA was replaced. Further, substituting ST with LIPA predicted improvements in cardio-metabolic risk markers, most notably insulin and HOMA-IR.ConclusionsThis is the first study to use compositional analysis of the 24 h movement composition in adults with overweight/obesity and pre-diabetes. These findings build on previous literature that suggest replacing ST with LIPA may produce metabolic benefits that contribute to the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the asymmetry in the predicted change in risk markers following the reallocation of time to/from MVPA highlights the importance of maintaining existing levels of MVPA. Journal Article International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 17 1 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 1479-5868 Physical activity; Sedentary time; Compositional analysis; Pre-diabetes 1 12 2020 2020-12-01 10.1186/s12966-020-00936-5 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-00936-5 COLLEGE NANME Engineering COLLEGE CODE EEN Swansea University 2020-02-21T13:57:39.7115259 2020-02-21T13:57:39.7115259 Nils Swindell 1 Paul Rees 0000-0002-7715-6914 2 Mikael Fogelholm 3 Mathijs Drummen 4 Ian MacDonald 5 J. Alfredo Martinez 6 Santiago Navas-Carretero 7 Teodora Handjieva-Darlenska 8 Nadka Boyadjieva 9 Georgi Bogdanov 10 Sally D. Poppitt 11 Nicholas Gant 12 Marta P. Silvestre 13 Jennie Brand-Miller 14 Wolfgang Schlicht 15 Roslyn Muirhead 16 Shannon Brodie 17 Heikki Tikkanen 18 Elli Jalo 19 Margriet Westerterp-Plantenga 20 Tanja Adam 21 Pia Siig Vestentoft 22 Thomas M. Larsen 23 Anne Raben 24 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 25 53619__16779__5cf78d8dd7f14291ac4755adeca1dd0b.pdf 53619.pdf 2020-03-05T16:09:31.2485312 Output 555433 application/pdf Version of Record true Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). true eng
title Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis
spellingShingle Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis
Nils, Swindell
Paul, Rees
Gareth, Stratton
title_short Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis
title_full Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis
title_fullStr Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis
title_full_unstemmed Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis
title_sort Compositional analysis of the associations between 24-h movement behaviours and cardio-metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese adults with pre-diabetes from the PREVIEW study: cross-sectional baseline analysis
author_id_str_mv d89a0a3fb118e1cf625fddc68cdf25bb
537a2fe031a796a3bde99679ee8c24f5
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01
author_id_fullname_str_mv d89a0a3fb118e1cf625fddc68cdf25bb_***_Nils, Swindell
537a2fe031a796a3bde99679ee8c24f5_***_Paul, Rees
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth, Stratton
author Nils, Swindell
Paul, Rees
Gareth, Stratton
author2 Nils Swindell
Paul Rees
Mikael Fogelholm
Mathijs Drummen
Ian MacDonald
J. Alfredo Martinez
Santiago Navas-Carretero
Teodora Handjieva-Darlenska
Nadka Boyadjieva
Georgi Bogdanov
Sally D. Poppitt
Nicholas Gant
Marta P. Silvestre
Jennie Brand-Miller
Wolfgang Schlicht
Roslyn Muirhead
Shannon Brodie
Heikki Tikkanen
Elli Jalo
Margriet Westerterp-Plantenga
Tanja Adam
Pia Siig Vestentoft
Thomas M. Larsen
Anne Raben
Gareth Stratton
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
container_volume 17
container_issue 1
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1479-5868
doi_str_mv 10.1186/s12966-020-00936-5
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-00936-5
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description BackgroundPhysical activity, sedentary time and sleep have been shown to be associated with cardio-metabolic health. However, these associations are typically studied in isolation or without accounting for the effect of all movement behaviours and the constrained nature of data that comprise a finite whole such as a 24 h day. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between the composition of daily movement behaviours (including sleep, sedentary time (ST), light intensity physical activity (LIPA) and moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA)) and cardio-metabolic health, in a cross-sectional analysis of adults with pre-diabetes. Further, we quantified the predicted differences following reallocation of time between behaviours.MethodsAccelerometers were used to quantify daily movement behaviours in 1462 adults from eight countries with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg·m− 2, impaired fasting glucose (IFG; 5.6–6.9 mmol·l− 1) and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 7.8–11.0 mmol•l− 1 2 h following oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT). Compositional isotemporal substitution was used to estimate the association of reallocating time between behaviours.ResultsReplacing MVPA with any other behaviour around the mean composition was associated with a poorer cardio-metabolic risk profile. Conversely, when MVPA was increased, the relationships with cardiometabolic risk markers was favourable but with smaller predicted changes than when MVPA was replaced. Further, substituting ST with LIPA predicted improvements in cardio-metabolic risk markers, most notably insulin and HOMA-IR.ConclusionsThis is the first study to use compositional analysis of the 24 h movement composition in adults with overweight/obesity and pre-diabetes. These findings build on previous literature that suggest replacing ST with LIPA may produce metabolic benefits that contribute to the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the asymmetry in the predicted change in risk markers following the reallocation of time to/from MVPA highlights the importance of maintaining existing levels of MVPA.
published_date 2020-12-01T04:15:33Z
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