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Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing

Saeid Khodabakhshi, Pasquale F. Fulvio, Enrico Andreoli Orcid Logo

Carbon, Volume: 162, Pages: 604 - 649

Swansea University Authors: Saeid Khodabakhshi , Enrico Andreoli Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Carbon Black (CB) is one of the most abundantly produced carbon nanostructured materials, and approximately 70% of it is used as pigment and as reinforcing phase in rubber and plastics. Recent scientific findings report on other uses of CB that are of current interest, such as renewable energy harve...

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Published in: Carbon
ISSN: 0008-6223
Published: Elsevier BV 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa53847
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spelling 2021-03-18T09:13:20.7898797 v2 53847 2020-03-23 Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing 547fd5929a2fd30733277eca799fbf9b Saeid Khodabakhshi Saeid Khodabakhshi true false cbd843daab780bb55698a3daccd74df8 0000-0002-1207-2314 Enrico Andreoli Enrico Andreoli true false 2020-03-23 CHEG Carbon Black (CB) is one of the most abundantly produced carbon nanostructured materials, and approximately 70% of it is used as pigment and as reinforcing phase in rubber and plastics. Recent scientific findings report on other uses of CB that are of current interest, such as renewable energy harvesting and carbon capture. The present review focuses on the use and role of CB in renewable and environmental applications relevant to contemporary global challenges focusing specifically on clean energy. Key and recent research on the structure and chemistry of CB, including its uses as precursors to graphene quantum dots and hollow carbon spheres, is discussed in relation to renewable energy devices, electrochemical energy storage and environmental remediation. The surface chemistry of CB is closely related to that of graphitic and of turbostratic carbons through the predominant hexagonal carbon lattice from graphene fragments forming its basic structural units. Consequently, modern methods for grafting polymers and functional groups are easily translated to this abundant nanostructured material. Moreover, recent advances in electron microscopy that probe the structure of CB, and its electronic and physicochemical properties in nanocomposites revived the attention of what is wrongfully considered as a scientifically uninspiring material with limited potential for future technology breakthrough. CB has the potential to surge as a key player in renewable energy and environmental applications, meaning “When Black Turns Green”. Journal Article Carbon 162 604 649 Elsevier BV 0008-6223 1 6 2020 2020-06-01 10.1016/j.carbon.2020.02.058 COLLEGE NANME Chemical Engineering COLLEGE CODE CHEG Swansea University 2021-03-18T09:13:20.7898797 2020-03-23T13:00:07.3092863 Saeid Khodabakhshi 1 Pasquale F. Fulvio 2 Enrico Andreoli 0000-0002-1207-2314 3 53847__16997__f730063dbed444699d578f1086878742.pdf 53847 (1).pdf 2020-04-02T19:22:49.8795489 Output 4196591 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND). true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
title Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing
spellingShingle Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing
Saeid, Khodabakhshi
Enrico, Andreoli
title_short Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing
title_full Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing
title_fullStr Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing
title_full_unstemmed Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing
title_sort Carbon black reborn: Structure and chemistry for renewable energy harnessing
author_id_str_mv 547fd5929a2fd30733277eca799fbf9b
cbd843daab780bb55698a3daccd74df8
author_id_fullname_str_mv 547fd5929a2fd30733277eca799fbf9b_***_Saeid, Khodabakhshi_***_
cbd843daab780bb55698a3daccd74df8_***_Enrico, Andreoli_***_0000-0002-1207-2314
author Saeid, Khodabakhshi
Enrico, Andreoli
author2 Saeid Khodabakhshi
Pasquale F. Fulvio
Enrico Andreoli
format Journal article
container_title Carbon
container_volume 162
container_start_page 604
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 0008-6223
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.carbon.2020.02.058
publisher Elsevier BV
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Carbon Black (CB) is one of the most abundantly produced carbon nanostructured materials, and approximately 70% of it is used as pigment and as reinforcing phase in rubber and plastics. Recent scientific findings report on other uses of CB that are of current interest, such as renewable energy harvesting and carbon capture. The present review focuses on the use and role of CB in renewable and environmental applications relevant to contemporary global challenges focusing specifically on clean energy. Key and recent research on the structure and chemistry of CB, including its uses as precursors to graphene quantum dots and hollow carbon spheres, is discussed in relation to renewable energy devices, electrochemical energy storage and environmental remediation. The surface chemistry of CB is closely related to that of graphitic and of turbostratic carbons through the predominant hexagonal carbon lattice from graphene fragments forming its basic structural units. Consequently, modern methods for grafting polymers and functional groups are easily translated to this abundant nanostructured material. Moreover, recent advances in electron microscopy that probe the structure of CB, and its electronic and physicochemical properties in nanocomposites revived the attention of what is wrongfully considered as a scientifically uninspiring material with limited potential for future technology breakthrough. CB has the potential to surge as a key player in renewable energy and environmental applications, meaning “When Black Turns Green”.
published_date 2020-06-01T04:20:03Z
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