No Cover Image

Journal article 147 views 42 downloads

Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study

Sally Wheelwright, Natalia V. Permyakova, Lynn Calman, Amy Din, Deborah Fenlon, Alison Richardson, Samantha Sodergren, Peter W. F. Smith, Jane Winter, Claire Foster, (Members of the Study Advisory Committee)

PLOS ONE, Volume: 15, Issue: 4, Start page: e0231332

Swansea University Author: Deborah Fenlon

  • Wheelwright et al 2020.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY).

    Download (1.41MB)

Abstract

BackgroundThe ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study is the first study to prospectively recruit colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, carry out the baseline assessment pre-treatment and follow patients up over five years to delineate the impact of treatment on health and wellbeing.MethodsCRC patients receiv...

Full description

Published in: PLOS ONE
ISSN: 1932-6203
Published: Public Library of Science (PLoS) 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54061
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2020-04-27T19:32:45Z
last_indexed 2020-10-23T03:06:30Z
id cronfa54061
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2020-10-22T17:15:18.3749544</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>54061</id><entry>2020-04-27</entry><title>Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>efa6c181fe0a6e5c923b1126ce469186</sid><firstname>Deborah</firstname><surname>Fenlon</surname><name>Deborah Fenlon</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2020-04-27</date><deptcode>FGMHL</deptcode><abstract>BackgroundThe ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study is the first study to prospectively recruit colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, carry out the baseline assessment pre-treatment and follow patients up over five years to delineate the impact of treatment on health and wellbeing.MethodsCRC patients received questionnaires at baseline (pre-surgery), 3, 9, 15, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months. The primary outcome was Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS); self- efficacy, mental health, social support, affect, socio-demographics, clinical and treatment characteristics were also assessed. Representativeness was evaluated. Predictors at base- line and at 24 months of subsequent worsened quality of life (QOL) were identified using multivariable regression models.ResultsA representative cohort of 1017 non-metastatic CRC patients were recruited from 29 UK cancer centres. Around one third did not return to pre-surgery levels of QOL five years after treatment. Baseline factors associated with worsened QOL included &gt;2 comorbidities, neoadjuvant treatment, high negative affect and low levels of self-efficacy, social support and positive affect. Predictors at 24 months included older age, low positive affect, high neg- ative affect, fatigue and poor cognitive functioning.ConclusionsSome risk factors for poor outcome up to five years following CRC surgery, such as self-effi- cacy, social support and comorbidity management, are amenable to change. Assessment of these factors from diagnosis to identify those most likely to need support in their recovery is warranted. Early intervention has the potential to improve outcomes.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>PLOS ONE</journal><volume>15</volume><journalNumber>4</journalNumber><paginationStart>e0231332</paginationStart><publisher>Public Library of Science (PLoS)</publisher><issnElectronic>1932-6203</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>9</publishedDay><publishedMonth>4</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2020</publishedYear><publishedDate>2020-04-09</publishedDate><doi>10.1371/journal.pone.0231332</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Medicine, Health and Life Science - Faculty</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>FGMHL</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2020-10-22T17:15:18.3749544</lastEdited><Created>2020-04-27T15:20:57.2580708</Created><path><level id="1">College of Human and Health Sciences</level><level id="2">Nursing</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Sally</firstname><surname>Wheelwright</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Natalia V.</firstname><surname>Permyakova</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Lynn</firstname><surname>Calman</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Din</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Deborah</firstname><surname>Fenlon</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Alison</firstname><surname>Richardson</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Samantha</firstname><surname>Sodergren</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Peter W. F.</firstname><surname>Smith</surname><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Jane</firstname><surname>Winter</surname><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Claire</firstname><surname>Foster</surname><order>10</order></author><author><firstname>(Members of the Study Advisory</firstname><surname>Committee)</surname><order>11</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>54061__17133__a76977b7bfbb47c1b9044ada1b200f50.pdf</filename><originalFilename>Wheelwright et al 2020.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2020-04-27T15:26:41.5346750</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>1474429</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY).</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language><licence>http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/</licence></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2020-10-22T17:15:18.3749544 v2 54061 2020-04-27 Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study efa6c181fe0a6e5c923b1126ce469186 Deborah Fenlon Deborah Fenlon true false 2020-04-27 FGMHL BackgroundThe ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study is the first study to prospectively recruit colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, carry out the baseline assessment pre-treatment and follow patients up over five years to delineate the impact of treatment on health and wellbeing.MethodsCRC patients received questionnaires at baseline (pre-surgery), 3, 9, 15, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months. The primary outcome was Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS); self- efficacy, mental health, social support, affect, socio-demographics, clinical and treatment characteristics were also assessed. Representativeness was evaluated. Predictors at base- line and at 24 months of subsequent worsened quality of life (QOL) were identified using multivariable regression models.ResultsA representative cohort of 1017 non-metastatic CRC patients were recruited from 29 UK cancer centres. Around one third did not return to pre-surgery levels of QOL five years after treatment. Baseline factors associated with worsened QOL included >2 comorbidities, neoadjuvant treatment, high negative affect and low levels of self-efficacy, social support and positive affect. Predictors at 24 months included older age, low positive affect, high neg- ative affect, fatigue and poor cognitive functioning.ConclusionsSome risk factors for poor outcome up to five years following CRC surgery, such as self-effi- cacy, social support and comorbidity management, are amenable to change. Assessment of these factors from diagnosis to identify those most likely to need support in their recovery is warranted. Early intervention has the potential to improve outcomes. Journal Article PLOS ONE 15 4 e0231332 Public Library of Science (PLoS) 1932-6203 9 4 2020 2020-04-09 10.1371/journal.pone.0231332 COLLEGE NANME Medicine, Health and Life Science - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGMHL Swansea University 2020-10-22T17:15:18.3749544 2020-04-27T15:20:57.2580708 College of Human and Health Sciences Nursing Sally Wheelwright 1 Natalia V. Permyakova 2 Lynn Calman 3 Amy Din 4 Deborah Fenlon 5 Alison Richardson 6 Samantha Sodergren 7 Peter W. F. Smith 8 Jane Winter 9 Claire Foster 10 (Members of the Study Advisory Committee) 11 54061__17133__a76977b7bfbb47c1b9044ada1b200f50.pdf Wheelwright et al 2020.pdf 2020-04-27T15:26:41.5346750 Output 1474429 application/pdf Version of Record true Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study
spellingShingle Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study
Deborah Fenlon
title_short Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study
title_full Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study
title_fullStr Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study
title_full_unstemmed Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study
title_sort Does quality of life return to pre-treatment levels five years after curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer? Evidence from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study
author_id_str_mv efa6c181fe0a6e5c923b1126ce469186
author_id_fullname_str_mv efa6c181fe0a6e5c923b1126ce469186_***_Deborah Fenlon
author Deborah Fenlon
author2 Sally Wheelwright
Natalia V. Permyakova
Lynn Calman
Amy Din
Deborah Fenlon
Alison Richardson
Samantha Sodergren
Peter W. F. Smith
Jane Winter
Claire Foster
(Members of the Study Advisory Committee)
format Journal article
container_title PLOS ONE
container_volume 15
container_issue 4
container_start_page e0231332
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1932-6203
doi_str_mv 10.1371/journal.pone.0231332
publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Nursing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Nursing
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description BackgroundThe ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study is the first study to prospectively recruit colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, carry out the baseline assessment pre-treatment and follow patients up over five years to delineate the impact of treatment on health and wellbeing.MethodsCRC patients received questionnaires at baseline (pre-surgery), 3, 9, 15, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months. The primary outcome was Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS); self- efficacy, mental health, social support, affect, socio-demographics, clinical and treatment characteristics were also assessed. Representativeness was evaluated. Predictors at base- line and at 24 months of subsequent worsened quality of life (QOL) were identified using multivariable regression models.ResultsA representative cohort of 1017 non-metastatic CRC patients were recruited from 29 UK cancer centres. Around one third did not return to pre-surgery levels of QOL five years after treatment. Baseline factors associated with worsened QOL included >2 comorbidities, neoadjuvant treatment, high negative affect and low levels of self-efficacy, social support and positive affect. Predictors at 24 months included older age, low positive affect, high neg- ative affect, fatigue and poor cognitive functioning.ConclusionsSome risk factors for poor outcome up to five years following CRC surgery, such as self-effi- cacy, social support and comorbidity management, are amenable to change. Assessment of these factors from diagnosis to identify those most likely to need support in their recovery is warranted. Early intervention has the potential to improve outcomes.
published_date 2020-04-09T04:08:32Z
_version_ 1737027499034935296
score 10.8881445