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Thermoelectric Paper: Graphite Pencil Traces on Paper to Fabricate a Thermoelectric Generator / Daniel, Jones; Charlie, Dunnill

Advanced Materials Technologies, Volume: 5, Issue: 7, Start page: 2000227

Swansea University Authors: Daniel, Jones, Charlie, Dunnill

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/admt.202000227

Abstract

Paper‐based thermoelectric generators are a promising and economical alternative to expensive organic conductors that are normally preferred for flexible generators. In the present work, graphite pencil traces on regular Xerox paper are successfully employed to constitute a thermoelectric generator....

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Published in: Advanced Materials Technologies
ISSN: 2365-709X 2365-709X
Published: Wiley
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54390
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Abstract: Paper‐based thermoelectric generators are a promising and economical alternative to expensive organic conductors that are normally preferred for flexible generators. In the present work, graphite pencil traces on regular Xerox paper are successfully employed to constitute a thermoelectric generator. In conjunction with polyethylenimine polymer, the graphite traces act as both the p‐type and n‐type thermoelectric “legs,” of a graphite‐based thermoelectric generator. The fabrication method is facile and requires no conducting paste or silver paste to connect individual thermoelectric legs. A test module containing five pairs of p‐n legs is fabricated on paper to test its performance. The device produces a thermoelectric voltage of 9.2 mV, generating an output power of 1.75 nW at a temperature difference of ≈60 K. The present work demonstrates that ordinary pencil on paper may be used as the foundation for a cheap, flexible, easily disposable, and environmentally friendly thermoelectric generator.
Issue: 7
Start Page: 2000227