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See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers / Yunhan Wu; Daniel Rough; Anna Bleakley; Justin Edwards; Orla Cooney; Philip R. Doyle; Leigh Clark; Benjamin R. Cowan

Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (Mobile HCI)

Swansea University Author: Leigh, Clark

DOI (Published version): 10.1145/3379503.3403563

Abstract

Limited linguistic coverage for Intelligent Personal Assistants (IPAs) means that many interact in a non-native language. Yet we know little about how IPAs currently support or hinder these users. Through native (L1) and non-native (L2) English speakers interacting with Google Assistant on a smartph...

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Published in: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (Mobile HCI)
Published: 2020
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54510
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spelling 2020-10-22T10:01:40.0435915 v2 54510 2020-06-18 See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers 004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0 0000-0002-9237-1057 Leigh Clark Leigh Clark true false 2020-06-18 SCS Limited linguistic coverage for Intelligent Personal Assistants (IPAs) means that many interact in a non-native language. Yet we know little about how IPAs currently support or hinder these users. Through native (L1) and non-native (L2) English speakers interacting with Google Assistant on a smartphone and smart speaker, we aim to understand this more deeply. Interviews revealed that L2 speakers prioritised utterance planning around perceived linguistic limitations, as opposed to L1 speakers prioritising succinctness because of system limitations. L2 speakers see IPAs as insensitive to linguistic needs resulting in failed interaction. L2 speakers clearly preferred using smartphones, as visual feedback supported diagnoses of communication breakdowns whilst allowing time to process query results. Conversely, L1 speakers preferred smart speakers, with audio feedback being seen as sufficient. We discuss the need to tailor the IPA experience for L2 users, emphasising visual feedback whilst reducing the burden of language production. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (Mobile HCI) 5 10 2020 2020-10-05 10.1145/3379503.3403563 COLLEGE NANME Computer Science COLLEGE CODE SCS Swansea University 2020-10-22T10:01:40.0435915 2020-06-18T13:36:12.2573141 College of Science Computer Science Yunhan Wu 1 Daniel Rough 2 Anna Bleakley 3 Justin Edwards 4 Orla Cooney 5 Philip R. Doyle 6 Leigh Clark 0000-0002-9237-1057 7 Benjamin R. Cowan 8 54510__17532__5cbb391a57fe416890d69da8db761be1.pdf 2006.06328.pdf 2020-06-18T13:38:44.9325192 Output 241231 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true false
title See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers
spellingShingle See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers
Leigh, Clark
title_short See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers
title_full See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers
title_fullStr See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers
title_full_unstemmed See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers
title_sort See what I’m saying? Comparing Intelligent Personal Assistant use for Native and Non-Native Language Speakers
author_id_str_mv 004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0
author_id_fullname_str_mv 004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0_***_Leigh, Clark
author Leigh, Clark
author2 Yunhan Wu
Daniel Rough
Anna Bleakley
Justin Edwards
Orla Cooney
Philip R. Doyle
Leigh Clark
Benjamin R. Cowan
format Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
container_title Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (Mobile HCI)
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.1145/3379503.3403563
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Computer Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Computer Science
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description Limited linguistic coverage for Intelligent Personal Assistants (IPAs) means that many interact in a non-native language. Yet we know little about how IPAs currently support or hinder these users. Through native (L1) and non-native (L2) English speakers interacting with Google Assistant on a smartphone and smart speaker, we aim to understand this more deeply. Interviews revealed that L2 speakers prioritised utterance planning around perceived linguistic limitations, as opposed to L1 speakers prioritising succinctness because of system limitations. L2 speakers see IPAs as insensitive to linguistic needs resulting in failed interaction. L2 speakers clearly preferred using smartphones, as visual feedback supported diagnoses of communication breakdowns whilst allowing time to process query results. Conversely, L1 speakers preferred smart speakers, with audio feedback being seen as sufficient. We discuss the need to tailor the IPA experience for L2 users, emphasising visual feedback whilst reducing the burden of language production.
published_date 2020-10-05T04:14:44Z
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