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« Supporting the Sacred Journey » : les histoires causales et le « problème » de la parentalité autochtone

Ashley Frawley Orcid Logo

Section 1 – Cultures de parentalité, Issue: 85, Pages: 85 - 107

Swansea University Author: Ashley Frawley Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.7202/1073743ar

Abstract

This article explores causal stories in constructions of social problems experienced by Canadian Indigenous peoples. Six documents are analysed using Qualitative Document Analysis (QDA): the Ontario Government funded Best Start program’s Supporting the Sacred Journey: From Preconception to Parenting...

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Published in: Section 1 – Cultures de parentalité
ISSN: 1204-3206 1703-9665
Published: Consortium Erudit 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54795
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Abstract: This article explores causal stories in constructions of social problems experienced by Canadian Indigenous peoples. Six documents are analysed using Qualitative Document Analysis (QDA): the Ontario Government funded Best Start program’s Supporting the Sacred Journey: From Preconception to Parenting for First Nations Families in Ontario (Best Start Resource Centre, 2012), four documents considering Indigenous health and well-being through the prism of parenthood (National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health, 2013a, 2013c, 2013b, 2015), and the Report on Children and Families Together, a January, 2018 emergency meeting regarding high numbers of Indigenous children in care. Two recurrent themes in causal stories were identified: ‘cultural deprivation through disruption’ and ‘parenting as root of problems’. Solutions tended to focus on building strength through support and cultural renewal, the latter appearing as glocalised mainstream Euro-American therapeutic discourses and parenting advice. It is argued that attention is potentially deflected from material inequalities, while glocalised therapeutic and parenting discourses may act as a Trojan horse for greater intervention into and monitoring of family life.
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Issue: 85
Start Page: 85
End Page: 107