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Comparing the acute effects of shiftwork on mothers and fathers

Philip Tucker Orcid Logo, C Leineweber, G Kecklund

Occupational Medicine, Volume: 71, Issue: 9

Swansea University Author: Philip Tucker Orcid Logo

  • Tucker et al 2021 (SW gender & children).pdf

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DOI (Published version): 10.1093/occmed/kqab083

Abstract

BackgroundShift work may impact women more negatively than men due to the increased burden of coping with demanding work schedules while also undertaking more of the domestic chores, including childcare.AimsTo examine whether the combination of shift working and caring for children affects the sleep...

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Published in: Occupational Medicine
ISSN: 0962-7480 1471-8405
Published: Oxford University Press (OUP) 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56967
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Abstract: BackgroundShift work may impact women more negatively than men due to the increased burden of coping with demanding work schedules while also undertaking more of the domestic chores, including childcare.AimsTo examine whether the combination of shift working and caring for children affects the sleep, fatigue and work–family conflict experienced by women more than it affects men.MethodsUsing data from a survey of the Swedish working population, mixed linear regression models examined work schedule (daywork, shift work with nights, shift work without nights), gender and presence of children <13 years at home as predictors of sleep insufficiency, sleep disturbance, fatigue and work–family conflict, over up to three successive measurement occasions. Adjustments were made for age, education, full/part-time working and baseline year.ResultsIn fully adjusted models (N = 8938), shift work was associated with insufficient sleep (P < 0.01), disturbed sleep (P < 0.01), fatigue (P < 0.05) and work–family conflict (P < 0.001). Interactions in the analyses of sleep disturbance (P < 0.001) and work–family interference (P < 0.05) indicated that among participants with no children, females reported more disturbed sleep and more work–family conflict than their male counterparts, irrespective of schedule; while among participants with children, female dayworkers reported more disturbed sleep than their male counterparts, and females working shifts without nights reported more work–family interference.ConclusionsHaving young children did not exacerbate negative effects of shift work, in either men or women. This may reflect high levels of gender equality and childcare provision in Sweden.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council for health, Working Life and Welfare (Forte) under grant 2016-07150; and by NordForsk Nordic Program on Health and Welfare under grant 74809.
Issue: 9