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Psychosocial working conditions of shiftworking nurses: A long‐term latent transition analysis

Aleksandra Bujacz, Ann Rudman, Petter Gustavsson, Anna Dahlgren, Philip Tucker Orcid Logo

Journal of Nursing Management, Volume: 29, Issue: 8

Swansea University Author: Philip Tucker Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/jonm.13430

Abstract

AimThis study aimed to identify profiles of working conditions to which nurses were exposed to over time and investigate how changes in working conditions relate to shiftworking and health.BackgroundPrevious studies rarely addressed the issue of working conditions development over long periods and t...

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Published in: Journal of Nursing Management
ISSN: 0966-0429 1365-2834
Published: Wiley 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57558
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Abstract: AimThis study aimed to identify profiles of working conditions to which nurses were exposed to over time and investigate how changes in working conditions relate to shiftworking and health.BackgroundPrevious studies rarely addressed the issue of working conditions development over long periods and the effects of such development on nurses' health.MethodsData from a national cohort of nurses in Sweden (N = 2936) were analysed using a person-centred analytical approach—latent profile and latent transition analysis.ResultsNurses report better psychosocial working conditions as they progress into mid-career. Shiftworking nurses experience poorer working conditions than their dayworking counterparts and tend to move from shiftwork to daywork as they progress into mid-career. In mid-career, nurses in work environments characterized by low autonomy and support tend to report poorer health outcomes.ConclusionCurrent analyses suggest that shiftworking nurses are particularly in need of interventions that address poor work environments. Not only do they experience more negative psychosocial working conditions than their dayworking counterparts, but they do so while having to contend with demanding schedules.Implications for Nursing ManagementThe findings highlight that organisational interventions should target different aspects of the work environment for nurses in diverse stages of their careers.
Keywords: burnout; job demands; latent transition analysis; shift work; sleep
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: FORTE Dnr 2016 07150, AFA Insurance Dnr 150284, and FORTE Dnr 2018-01005
Issue: 8