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Time-resolved in situ synchrotron-microCT: 4D deformation of bone and bone analogues using digital volume correlation / Marta Peña Fernández, Alexander P. Kao, Roxane Bonithon, David Howells, Andrew J. Bodey, Kazimir Wanelik, Frank Witte, Richard Johnston, Hari Arora, Gianluca Tozzi

Acta Biomaterialia, Volume: 131, Pages: 424 - 439

Swansea University Authors: David Howells, Richard Johnston, Hari Arora

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 12th June 2022

Abstract

Digital volume correlation (DVC) in combination with high-resolution micro-computed tomography (microCT) imaging and in situ mechanical testing is gaining popularity for quantifying 3D full-field strains in bone and biomaterials. However, traditional in situ time-lapsed (i.e., interrupted) mechanica...

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Published in: Acta Biomaterialia
ISSN: 1742-7061
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57047
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Abstract: Digital volume correlation (DVC) in combination with high-resolution micro-computed tomography (microCT) imaging and in situ mechanical testing is gaining popularity for quantifying 3D full-field strains in bone and biomaterials. However, traditional in situ time-lapsed (i.e., interrupted) mechanical testing cannot fully capture the dynamic strain mechanisms in viscoelastic biological materials. The aim of this study was to investigate the time-resolved deformation of bone structures and analogues via continuous in situ synchrotron-radiation microCT (SR-microCT) compression and DVC to gain a better insight into their structure-function relationships. Fast SR-microCT imaging enabled the deformation behaviour to be captured with high temporal and spatial resolution. Time-resolved DVC highlighted the relationship between local strains and damage initiation and progression in the different biostructures undergoing plastic deformation, bending and/or buckling of their main microstructural elements. The results showed that SR-microCT continuous mechanical testing complemented and enhanced the information obtained from time-lapsed testing, which may underestimate the 3D strain magnitudes as a result of the stress relaxation occurring in between steps before image acquisition in porous biomaterials. Altogether, the findings of this study highlight the importance of time-resolved in situ experiments to fully characterise the time-dependent mechanical behaviour of biological tissues and biomaterials and to further explore their micromechanics under physiologically relevant conditions.
Keywords: Bone, time-resolved SR-microCT, continuous in situ mechanics, digital volume correlation, time-dependent behaviour
College: College of Engineering
Start Page: 424
End Page: 439