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Testing an online measure of portion size selection: a pilot study concerned with the measurement of ideal portion size

Rochelle Embling, Michelle Lee Orcid Logo, Menna Price Orcid Logo, Laura Wilkinson Orcid Logo

Pilot and Feasibility Studies, Volume: 7, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Rochelle Embling, Michelle Lee Orcid Logo, Menna Price Orcid Logo, Laura Wilkinson Orcid Logo

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Abstract

BackgroundPortion size is known to be a key driver of food intake. As consumed portions are often pre-planned, ‘ideal portion size’—an individual’s preferred meal size selected prior to eating—has been identified as a strong predictor of actual consumption. However, assessments of ideal portion size...

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Published in: Pilot and Feasibility Studies
ISSN: 2055-5784
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57743
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Abstract: BackgroundPortion size is known to be a key driver of food intake. As consumed portions are often pre-planned, ‘ideal portion size’—an individual’s preferred meal size selected prior to eating—has been identified as a strong predictor of actual consumption. However, assessments of ideal portion size have predominantly relied on laboratory-based computer tasks, limiting use online. Therefore, this cross-sectional study sought to pilot test the validity of a web-based tool to measure ideal portion size.MethodsIn an online study (N = 48), participants responded to images of a range of foods. Each food was photographed in a series of different portions and loaded into an ‘image carousel’ that would allow participants to change the size of the displayed portion by moving a slider left-to-right. Using this image carousel, participants selected their ideal portion size. They also completed measures of expected satiety and expected satiation and self-reported their age and body mass index (BMI). A non-parametric correlation matrix was used to explore associations between ideal portion size and identified predictors of food intake.ResultsSupporting convergent validity of this measure, ideal portion size was significantly correlated with expected satiety (rs = .480) and expected satiation (rs = −.310) after controlling for effects of baseline hunger and fullness, consistent with past research. Similarly, supporting divergent validity of this measure, ideal portion size was not significantly correlated with age (rs = −.032) or BMI (rs = −.111,).ConclusionsPilot results support the validity of this web-based portion size selection tool used to measure ideal portion size, though further research is needed to validate use with comparisons to actual food intake.
Keywords: Portion size; Meal size; Expected satiety; Expected satiation; Online; Survey; Pilot
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: ESRC Wales Doctoral Training Partnership
Issue: 1