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Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing

Joe Antoun Orcid Logo, Daniel J. Brown Orcid Logo, Daniel J. W. Jones Orcid Logo, Beth G. Clarkson, Anthony I. Shepherd Orcid Logo, Nicholas C. Sangala, Robert J. Lewis, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Laura Mason Orcid Logo, Jo Corbett Orcid Logo, Zoe L. Saynor Orcid Logo

Journal of Renal Care

Swansea University Authors: Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Laura Mason Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/jorc.12416

Abstract

BackgroundWhen people with chronic kidney disease reach kidney failure, renal replacement therapy is usually required to improve symptoms and maintain life. Although in-centre haemodialysis is most commonly used for this purpose, other forms of dialysis are available, including home haemodialysis an...

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Published in: Journal of Renal Care
ISSN: 1755-6678 1755-6686
Published: Wiley 2022
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Although in-centre haemodialysis is most commonly used for this purpose, other forms of dialysis are available, including home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. ObjectivesWe aimed to explore the experiences of adults living with chronic kidney disease who were either approaching the need for dialysis or had reached kidney failure and were receiving a form of dialysis. In particular, we explored how different forms of dialysis affect their quality of life, wellbeing and physical activity. MethodsIndividual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 adults with kidney failure, comprising four groups (n = 10 each): those receiving in-centre haemodialysis, home haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, or pre-dialysis. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, thematically analysed and then composite vignettes were subsequently developed to present a rich narrative of the collective experiences of each group. FindingsCompared with adults who were pre-dialysis, quality of life and wellbeing improved upon initiation of their home haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Conversely, minimal improvement was perceived by those receiving in-centre haemodialysis. Low physical activity was reported across all four groups, although those receiving home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis reported a greater desire and ability to be physically active than those in-centre.ConclusionThese findings highlight that dialysis modalities not requiring regular hospital attendance (i.e. home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis) improve independence, quality of life, wellbeing and can facilitate a more physically active lifestyle.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Renal Care</journal><volume>0</volume><journalNumber/><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher>Wiley</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>1755-6678</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1755-6686</issnElectronic><keywords>home haemodialysis; patient experience; peritoneal dialysis; quality of Life</keywords><publishedDay>28</publishedDay><publishedMonth>2</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2022</publishedYear><publishedDate>2022-02-28</publishedDate><doi>10.1111/jorc.12416</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><funders>NxStage Medical Inc</funders><lastEdited>2022-07-08T13:36:56.2763772</lastEdited><Created>2022-02-08T08:52:06.0904664</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Joe</firstname><surname>Antoun</surname><orcid>0000-0002-9678-4326</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel J.</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><orcid>0000-0002-2210-3225</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel J. W.</firstname><surname>Jones</surname><orcid>0000-0003-2008-9658</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Beth G.</firstname><surname>Clarkson</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Anthony I.</firstname><surname>Shepherd</surname><orcid>0000-0001-6392-7944</orcid><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Nicholas C.</firstname><surname>Sangala</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Robert J.</firstname><surname>Lewis</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Laura</firstname><surname>Mason</surname><orcid>0000-0002-9679-7063</orcid><order>10</order></author><author><firstname>Jo</firstname><surname>Corbett</surname><orcid>0000-0002-6552-6471</orcid><order>11</order></author><author><firstname>Zoe L.</firstname><surname>Saynor</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0674-8477</orcid><order>12</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>59328__22556__27bc28fcca854b0798f8c43acab4b27d.pdf</filename><originalFilename>59328.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2022-03-09T13:13:49.5183467</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>1353328</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>© 2022 The Authors. 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spelling v2 59328 2022-02-08 Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false ef88a9ba99af7706e3e80e418f482e0a 0000-0002-9679-7063 Laura Mason Laura Mason true false 2022-02-08 STSC BackgroundWhen people with chronic kidney disease reach kidney failure, renal replacement therapy is usually required to improve symptoms and maintain life. Although in-centre haemodialysis is most commonly used for this purpose, other forms of dialysis are available, including home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. ObjectivesWe aimed to explore the experiences of adults living with chronic kidney disease who were either approaching the need for dialysis or had reached kidney failure and were receiving a form of dialysis. In particular, we explored how different forms of dialysis affect their quality of life, wellbeing and physical activity. MethodsIndividual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 adults with kidney failure, comprising four groups (n = 10 each): those receiving in-centre haemodialysis, home haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, or pre-dialysis. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, thematically analysed and then composite vignettes were subsequently developed to present a rich narrative of the collective experiences of each group. FindingsCompared with adults who were pre-dialysis, quality of life and wellbeing improved upon initiation of their home haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Conversely, minimal improvement was perceived by those receiving in-centre haemodialysis. Low physical activity was reported across all four groups, although those receiving home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis reported a greater desire and ability to be physically active than those in-centre.ConclusionThese findings highlight that dialysis modalities not requiring regular hospital attendance (i.e. home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis) improve independence, quality of life, wellbeing and can facilitate a more physically active lifestyle. Journal Article Journal of Renal Care 0 Wiley 1755-6678 1755-6686 home haemodialysis; patient experience; peritoneal dialysis; quality of Life 28 2 2022 2022-02-28 10.1111/jorc.12416 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University NxStage Medical Inc 2022-07-08T13:36:56.2763772 2022-02-08T08:52:06.0904664 College of Engineering Sports Science Joe Antoun 0000-0002-9678-4326 1 Daniel J. Brown 0000-0002-2210-3225 2 Daniel J. W. Jones 0000-0003-2008-9658 3 Beth G. Clarkson 4 Anthony I. Shepherd 0000-0001-6392-7944 5 Nicholas C. Sangala 6 Robert J. Lewis 7 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 8 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 9 Laura Mason 0000-0002-9679-7063 10 Jo Corbett 0000-0002-6552-6471 11 Zoe L. Saynor 0000-0003-0674-8477 12 59328__22556__27bc28fcca854b0798f8c43acab4b27d.pdf 59328.pdf 2022-03-09T13:13:49.5183467 Output 1353328 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2022 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing
spellingShingle Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing
Melitta McNarry
Kelly Mackintosh
Laura Mason
title_short Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing
title_full Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing
title_fullStr Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing
title_full_unstemmed Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing
title_sort Exploring patients' experiences of the impact of dialysis therapies on quality of life and wellbeing
author_id_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
ef88a9ba99af7706e3e80e418f482e0a
author_id_fullname_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta McNarry
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly Mackintosh
ef88a9ba99af7706e3e80e418f482e0a_***_Laura Mason
author Melitta McNarry
Kelly Mackintosh
Laura Mason
author2 Joe Antoun
Daniel J. Brown
Daniel J. W. Jones
Beth G. Clarkson
Anthony I. Shepherd
Nicholas C. Sangala
Robert J. Lewis
Melitta McNarry
Kelly Mackintosh
Laura Mason
Jo Corbett
Zoe L. Saynor
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Renal Care
container_volume 0
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 1755-6678
1755-6686
doi_str_mv 10.1111/jorc.12416
publisher Wiley
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description BackgroundWhen people with chronic kidney disease reach kidney failure, renal replacement therapy is usually required to improve symptoms and maintain life. Although in-centre haemodialysis is most commonly used for this purpose, other forms of dialysis are available, including home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. ObjectivesWe aimed to explore the experiences of adults living with chronic kidney disease who were either approaching the need for dialysis or had reached kidney failure and were receiving a form of dialysis. In particular, we explored how different forms of dialysis affect their quality of life, wellbeing and physical activity. MethodsIndividual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 40 adults with kidney failure, comprising four groups (n = 10 each): those receiving in-centre haemodialysis, home haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, or pre-dialysis. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, thematically analysed and then composite vignettes were subsequently developed to present a rich narrative of the collective experiences of each group. FindingsCompared with adults who were pre-dialysis, quality of life and wellbeing improved upon initiation of their home haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Conversely, minimal improvement was perceived by those receiving in-centre haemodialysis. Low physical activity was reported across all four groups, although those receiving home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis reported a greater desire and ability to be physically active than those in-centre.ConclusionThese findings highlight that dialysis modalities not requiring regular hospital attendance (i.e. home haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis) improve independence, quality of life, wellbeing and can facilitate a more physically active lifestyle.
published_date 2022-02-28T13:36:56Z
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